Tag Archives: eap

15 Keys to Mental Health Safety Net

Acknowledgment: Thank you, Dr. Jodi Frey and Jon Kinning, for assisting in the preparation of this article.

The employee assistance program (EAP) might be one of the best-kept secrets for many employers. Instead, EAPs should be resources widely publicized to help encourage managers, employees and often their family members so that support services for personal and workplace problems can mitigate risk and promote vibrant workers. Many employers simply “check the box” when signing up for the EAP benefit, figuring health insurance will cover the mental health needs of their employees; however, most employers really don’t know what the EAP services entail or the value the services can bring to a workplace.

With that said, not all EAPs are created equal. EAP services vary greatly, including some or all of the following::

  • biospsychosocial assessments, including substance use assessments
  • individual and family counseling
  • financial and legal coaching and referrals for counseling
  • referrals for additional services, with follow-up
  • psychoeducation through workshops, newsletters and other communication for personal and workplace concerns, including stress management, parenting, mental health literacy, relationships and organizational change and individual crisis prevention, crisis response and support
  • mediation and team development
  • leadership consultation, coaching and development
  • fitness for duty evaluations
  • suicide risk assessment, treatment and “postvention” (i.e. what to do after a suicide)
  • staff training on best practices on how to support someone in distress
  • and more

Sometimes, the services are cursory, such as a brief telephone assessment and referral by a contracted outside provider. Other EAPs provide robust and high-touch services like 24-hour support; on-line assessment and information; telephone and in-person assessment and counseling; on-demand crisis consultation; on-site workshops; mental wellness promotion; and much more. As with many things, you get what you pay for, so employers need to decide how much they are willing to invest in the mental wellbeing of their workers and conduct a cost-benefit analysis. However, EAPs, even more customized programs with onsite services, have been shown to be cost-effective to employers through the years.

Are EAPs Effective?

While the research on the effectiveness of EAPs is limited, studies have found that employees’ use of EAPs enhanced outcomes, especially in “presenteeism” (how healthy and productive employees are), life satisfaction, functioning and often absenteeism (Joseph, et al., 2017; Frey, Pompe, Sharar, Imboden, & Bloom 2018; Attridge et al., 2018; Richmond, et al., 2017). In one longitudinal, controlled study, EAP participants were more likely than non-EAP participants to see a reduction in anxiety and depression (Richmond, et al, 2016). Another matched control study found that users of EAP services often reduced their absenteeism more quickly than non-EAP users experiencing similar challenges (Nunes, 2018). In another longitudinal study (Nakao, et al, 2007), 86% of people who were suicidal when they engaged with their EAP were no longer suicidal at two years follow-up. Researchers have concluded that, while not all EAPs are created equal, they often provide accessible services that are effective at improving employee mental health and well-being.

See also: Impact on Mental Health in Work Comp  

Are EAPs Prepared to Support an Employer Facing an Employee Crisis With Suicide?

When it comes to the life-and-death issue of suicide, EAPs have the potential to provide evidence-based suicide prevention, intervention and postvention services to employers. The EAPs’ contribution to the comprehensive workplace suicide prevention strategy is essential, and many would benefit from annual state-of-the-art training in evidence-based methods of suicide risk formulation and treatment to help distressed employees get back on their feet. Social workers, who provide the majority of EAP clinical services in the U.S., often report having no formal training in suicide formulation, response and recovery (Feldman & Freedenthal, 2006; Jacobson et al., 2004), so annual continuing education on suicide intervention and suicide grief support is often helpful to providers. Once trustworthy and credentialed providers have been identified, they should be highlighted in the “suicide crisis” protocol, so that companies are not trying to do this leg work in the midst of a crisis.

If one of the main messages in suicide prevention is “seek help,” we need to make sure the providers are confident and competent with best practices approaches to alleviating suicidal despair and getting people back on track to a life worth living. Thus, dedicated employers will evaluate and even challenge their EAP providers to demonstrate continuing education in the areas of suicide prevention, intervention and postvention skills. In fact, some states are mandating that all mental health professionals, including licensed providers of EAP services, have some sort of continuing training in suicide risk formulation and recovery.

Do Employees Know About the Benefit of Their EAP?

In addition to making sure the providers have the needed skills, companies need to make sure that their employees know when and how to access the care. Recently, the American Heart Association and CEO Roundtable worked with experts in the behavioral health field to develop a white paper for employers, which includes seven specific actions employers can take to improve the mental health of their employees (Center for Workplace Health, American Heart Association, 2019). The report can be viewed online here. Dr. Jodi Frey, expert panelist for the report and internationally recognized expert in the EAP and broader behavioral health field recommends that “employers need carefully consider their workplace’s needs when selecting an EAP, and then should work with their EAP as a strategic partner to develop programs and communications that encourage utilization of the program and continued evaluation to improve services over time.” (Dr. Jodi Frey, personal communication, March 18, 2019).

Employers that are mindful of their workers’ well-being will continually promote well-vetted and employee-backed resources throughout the career of the workers. Leadership testimonials of the efficacy of the resources after the leaders have used them for their own mental health would bring credibility to the resources and model appropriate self-care to the employees. Bringing the resources on-site to the workers (and not waiting until the workers stumble upon the resources) is another way to break through the barriers to care. The Employee Assistance Society for North American (EASNA) developed a guide to help employers evaluate EAPs and determine appropriate vendors. The guide also can be used to help employers evaluate their current EAP and decide if needs are being met or if more attention to what services should be offered needs to be addressed. The guide can be downloaded free.

Are There Different Types of EAPs?

Much diversity exists in EAP structure and quality (Frey, et al, 2018). Some companies use internal EAPs, where providers are also employees of the company. This arrangement often provides the benefit of having an immediate resource that has clear knowledge of the company and industry culture. Evaluation of internal EAPs has found increased utilization, customization and supervisor referrals (Frey, et al, 2018); however, there are some drawbacks. Internal EAPs, because they are so closely connected to the company, run the risk of being perceived as having blurred lines of confidentiality and objectivity. By contrast, external EAPs are often more diverse and can respond 24/7 across a vast geography. Because of these benefits and consequences, many companies have moved to a hybrid model to get the best of both models.

Hybrid EAPs often have an internal employee to manage the EAP and to work with managers and employees on critical incident response, strategic planning and organizational change, and to provide onsite assessment and problem resolution. They can be an important ally for the employer to understand the potential for an EAP and to help evaluate whether EAP providers are effective in their response and offering high-quality services (Frey, 2017).

See also: What if They Say ‘Yes’ to Suicide Question?  

EAPs are most effective when they understand the industry and organizational culture, have business acumen and can adapt to changes in organizational structure (Frey, et al., 2017; Frey, et al., 2018). Thus, employers seeking to find a best fit for their employees will interview mental health providers about their knowledge of the unique stressors and strengths in the industry. Some industries (e.g., emergency responders and aviation) have gone so far as to credential mental health providers as being specialists in their industry to avoid a mismatch.

Case Study From the COO of a Construction Contractor

“We had an issue where our EAP was referring counselors outside of our healthcare providers, so, after the three free sessions, the participant learned they could only continue with the suggested provider at $150 a session; so the employees would drop out. My understanding is that counseling often takes around seven sessions to have a sustained impact, so, I put in a mandate with our HR team to renegotiate our EAP to ONLY refer in-network counselors, or they would pay for the continued care.

“We then incorporated our EAP into our safety program. When there is a serious accident, we deploy counselors and have our EAP involved for post-accident assistance to our employees. Accidents can bring up traumatic responses from our employees, and these experiences bring up memories from other accidents they may have been involved in or around. This cumulation of trauma can be highly distressing for them.

“In the early years, we had to work through the skepticism that the EAP would notify management of anyone that used the service. Since HIPAA came into play, we have less of this skepticism. The employees thought they would get fired or laid off first if they had issues.

“I’ve worked with our safety and wellness groups to actually pick up and call the EAP for someone in distress and get them on the phone. Once they lay the groundwork with the counselor, they hand the phone over and leave and let the employee get the help they need. This helps break down the stigma, and some people just don’t have the courage or have a mental block about picking up the phone for help. This has been VERY effective to get those in need the help they need.

“We promote our EAP in our weekly newsletter, and we also have business cards with the information, and we utilize hard-hat stickers that have all the information. This helps it be available when they need it.

“I’ve also encouraged our managers to use the system so they can promote it from their point of view. This also has helped remove the stigma around using the EAP. I also talk when in front of our employees about the program and educate them so they will use it. Our utilization rate is the highest in our EAP network, and I think this is the reason why.”

15 Questions Workplaces Should Ask to Strengthen the Mental Health Safety Net

Employers should remember they are the customers of their EAP, and they should do the due diligence to make sure they are getting the best benefit possible. Here are 15 questions employers should ask their EAP to get the best services possible:

  1. What services does your EAP cover? Are these services available 24/7?
  2. Who answers the calls of the EAP, and how are they trained and supervised? What professional and educational preparation and certifications do they have? Are they licensed?
  3. How are counselors selected and trained? Are certain licenses and other credentials required to be a part of the EAP provider network?
  4. What types of training have EAP providers received? Specifically, when was the last time they received training in suicide risk formulation and treatment?
  5. How is your EAP reporting utilization? How does your workplace’s utilization rate compare with others in your industry and what can be done by the EAP and by you as the employer to encourage more utilization?
  6. Do your employees know about your EAP services and how to access them?
  7. For those who have used the EAP, how satisfied were they with the services? Did the services help with the problem for which they were seeking support?
  8. When employees completed EAP services, did the EAP follow up (or attempt to follow up) with the employee to make sure all needs were met?
  9. How does your EAP interact with health plans? Are EAP providers also providers of outpatient mental health, and, if not, are they well-versed in the benefits of employees to make effective and seamless referrals?
  10. How is your EAP measuring outcomes? Can they also provide you with a return-on-investment (ROI) or other cost-benefit analysis?
  11. How is the EAP promoting upstream mental health efforts like prevention, resilience, positive psychology and work-life integration?
  12. Are there general mental health screening or other wellness tools the EAP can offer the workers to help them understand and monitor their mental wellness? Does the organization also assess its own culture of system-level mental wellness?
  13. Does the EAP have experience serving clients in our industry? If yes, what are some recommendations to improve how EAP services are promoted and offered at our workplace?
  14. Is the employer receiving regular reports (i.e., bi-annual, annual) from the EAP on utilization, presenting problems, satisfaction and other workplace outcomes?
  15. Does the EAP provide manager or HR training on how best to support an employee experiencing a mental health or suicide crisis? Are there additional staff training on skills needed to identify and assist employees in distress?

10 Steps for Dealing With a Suicide

(Adapted from A Manager’s Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplace: 10 Action Steps for Dealing With the Aftermath of a Suicide)

Death jars our concept of the way life is supposed to be. That dissonance is multiplied when the death is by suicide.

Following the tragedy of death by suicide, the workforce will include people whose personal struggles already leave them vulnerable and who now face increased risk for destructive behavior, including suicide. Tragedy can beget additional tragedies. Sometimes irrational blaming behavior includes violence. Sometimes suicide contagion, or “copycat suicides,” occur. How leaders respond (postvention) after death by suicide is critical to stopping that negative momentum.

“Postvention” can be prevention

Defined by the Suicide Prevention Resource Council as “the provision of crisis intervention and other support after a suicide has occurred to address and alleviate possible effects of suicide,” effective postvention has been found to stabilize community, prevent contagion and facilitate return to a new normal.

  1. Coordinate: Contain the crisis. Like the highway patrolmen on-sight at a traffic accident, postvention aims to prevent one tragedy from leading to another and return normal progression as soon as is safely possible.
  1. Notify: Protect and respect the privacy rights of the deceased employee and the person’s loved ones during death notification.
  1. Communicate: Reduce the potential for contagion. Communicate, communicate, communicate meaningful information. Keep it simple. Make it practical. Focus on solutions to immediate issues. Repeat it. Repeat it again.

Crisis Care Network, the largest provider of critical incident response services to the workplace, developed a crisis communication process that has been helpful for business leaders. The acronym ACT describes a means of acknowledging, communicating and transitioning amid a crisis.

See Also: 6 Things to Do to Prevent Suicide

Acknowledge and name the incident

  • Have an accurate understanding of the facts and avoid conjecture.
  • Demonstrate the courage to use real language that names what occurred.
  • Acknowledge that the incident has an impact on team members and that it is okay that individuals will be affected differently.

Communicate pertinent information with both compassion and competence

  • In the absence of information, people create it. Providing information reduces the likelihood of rumors, builds trust and provides a sense of order that supports moving forward.
  • Although very difficult to do when affected by traumatic stress oneself, communicating with both competence and compassion demonstrates leadership effectiveness in a caring way. Employee assistance program (EAP) consultants often help business leaders by scripting and coaching their messaging.

Transition toward a future focus

  • Communicate an expectation of recovery. Those affected must gain a vision of “survivor” rather than “victim.” Research indicates that humans are an amazingly resilient species and overwhelmingly bounces back from adversity.
  • Communicate flexible and reasonable accommodations as people progress to a new normal. Employees should not all be expected to immediately function at full productivity (although some will) but will recover quicker if assigned to simple, concrete tasks. Structure and focus are helpful, and extended time away from work often inhibits recovery. “If you fall off a horse…..get back on a pony.”
  1. Support: Offer practical assistance to the family and those affected.
  1. Link: Identify and link affected employees to additional support resources and refer those most affected to professional mental health services.

How to lead effective suicide postvention was likely not part of most business leaders’ education or training. When these tragedies occur, leaders often engage their EAP to deploy critical incident response experts – behavioral health professionals with unique training in response to tragedies. These consultants will:

  • Consult with the organization’s leadership regarding crisis communication strategies that facilitate resilience
  • Draw circles of impact and shape an appropriate response
  • Let people talk if they wish to do so
  • Identify normal reactions to an abnormal event so that people don’t panic regarding their own reactions
  • Build group support
  • Outline self-help recovery strategies
  • Brainstorm solutions to overcome immediate return-to-function and return-to-life obstacles
  • Assess movement toward either immediate business-as-usual functioning or additional care. Following death by suicide, they will be especially attuned to assess others for risk of self-harm.
  1. Comfort: Support, comfort and promote healthy grieving of the employees who have been affected by the loss. Critical incident response consultants will guide, coach, and script leaders regarding compassionate messaging. Leaders must “give permission” for help-seeking behavior.
  1. Restore: Restore equilibrium and optimal functioning in the workplace.

Sensitively resume a familiar schedule. People do best when their natural rhythms kick back in. Routine. No surprises. One foot in front of the other, just like yesterday.

Facilitate successful completion of familiar tasks. Doing something tangible reduces that sense of powerlessness and helps people focus on what they can do, rather than panic about what they cannot. The structure of doing what one knows how to do is helpful in finding a “new normal.”

  1. Lead: Build and sustain trust and confidence in organizational leadership. The team will never forget the leader’s response. Neither will the leader. Effective provision of both guidance and support will lead to the team feeling cared for in the workplace and result in loyalty and faith in their leadership’s abilities. People will go through the crisis with or without leadership. Lead them.
  1. Honor: Prepare for anniversary reactions and other milestone dates. Mark these dates on the calendar and then respectfully acknowledge them in large or small ways. Honor those affected by the death.
  • Sustain: Move from postvention to suicide prevention.

All involved stakeholders will now own the fact that “it can happen here.” Use that momentum to keep others safer. Following death by suicide, leaders all become “first responders.” Rather than being overwhelmed by the first tragedy, they can prevent others.

Broader Approach to Workplace Violence

With the recent terrorist attack in San Bernardino, CA, fresh on people’s minds, workplace violence has received major media coverage, but little to no attention is paid to deaths by suicide even though rates in the U.S. have gone up considerably in recent years. Suicides claim an average of 36,000 lives annually, and, while most people take their lives in or near home, suicide on the job is also increasing.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that workplace suicides rose to 282 in 2013, the highest level since the numbers have been reported. In 2014, the suicide rate went down slightly to 271, but that is still the second highest level. The annual average number of suicides deaths that occurred at work during the time period 2003 – 2014 is 237, for a total of 2,848. Since 2007, the numbers have been above the average.

Screen Shot 2015-12-28 at 3.30.07 PM

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

The rise in suicide rates at work is even more significant given that overall homicides in the workplace have been steadily decreasing since the mid-’90s.

The obvious question is: Why is this startling rise in suicide rates at work occurring?

“The reasons for suicide are complex, no matter where they take place,” said Christine Montier, CMO of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. “Usually, many factors are at play.”

Many suicide prevention experts linked the increase in one way or another to the Great Recession. I believe the recession played a major role because it put a triple whammy on people. Housing, which has traditionally been the major investment and retirement source for Americans, was in the toilet. Foreclosures were at an all-time high. Companies were laying off people, and job prospects were slim.

I believe that many working people experienced daily stress about employment. Every day, they might be laid off. Many were severely overworked because they needed to pick up the slack caused by reductions in workforces. They faced continuous fear of taking time off for vacations or illness and had few options to leave because jobs elsewhere were scarce.

Put all these issues in the pot together, and some people could not see their way out of their dilemma except through suicide.

Researchers in a study published by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine suspect that suicides occur at work because the perpetrators wanted to protect family and friends from discovering their bodies.

In the midst of the fear of terrorist attacks and active shooting incidents, organizations are significantly challenged in how to deal with the spectrum of violence they may face. However, it is critical that organizations not shy away from addressing these issues and muster the resources to engage their employees.

Managers need clear guidelines on healthy approaches to manage and prevent violence in the multiple forms it can take. Two industries that have taken the issue of suicides at work head-on are construction and law enforcement.

What can management do?

Promote awareness

Stop thinking and acting like “it couldn’t happen at your company.Provide regular communications through the channels that are most effective in your company regarding the potential warning signs that employees or others are at risk of acting in a violent manner. See a list of the classic early warning signs of workplace violence here. Many of the signs are also telltale signs symptoms of depression and suicidal behavior.

Sally Spencer-Thomas, Psy.D., co-founder of Working Minds, a Colorado-based workplace-suicide-prevention organization, described a giveaway that’s more obvious than one might suspect: The employee will tell you.

When contemplating suicide, a person can be entirely consumed by the thought, she said. The problem may be coded in conversation—the individual may talk about death often, for instance.

As uncomfortable as it may seem, it’s important to bite the bullet and ask the awkward questions. “It is very hard to resist a human who is coming at you with compassion,” Spencer-Thomas observed. She suggests that HR professionals frame their questions in an understanding manner, giving the employee the opportunity to explain his or her condition. Statements such as, “I’ve noticed that …,” “It’s understandable given …,” and “I’m wondering if it’s true for you…” should be followed by a nonjudgmental statement.

Promote resources available to help employees

If your firm has an employee assistance program (EAP) or your healthcare provider offers counseling service, make sure that managers are trained about the program and skilled in how to make an effective employee referral. If your employee usage rates are below your industry average, you need to assess why and take action to increase usage. Talking to a professional counselor can make a big difference to a troubled employee.

If your firm does not offer an EAP, then identify community resources that can assist your employees and keep the list current.

HR should also have a strategy to deal with the devastating impact of a homicide or suicide at work.

I believe the time has come for executives to take a comprehensive approach to violence that occurs in the workplace and especially to bring mental health and suicide issues out of the closet into mainstream workplace conversations. We are past the point where organizations can think of suicide as a dirty little secret and hope it will go away. The time has come for meaningful action.

Don’t wait until something happens and people lose their lives. If you really mean that your employees are your most important asset, now is the time to step up.

Hope on Depression in the Workplace

There is a silent epidemic taking a toll on the American workforce. This illness affects 9.5% of the adult population and is to blame for 200 million lost workdays each year. Those lost workdays cost employers an estimated $17 billion to $44 billion. Despite these staggering statistics, only one-third of those affected by this common illness will ever seek professional help. What is this cause of disability, absenteeism and productivity loss? Depression.

There are many reasons an employee may keep concerns about his mental health private. Stigma, fear of losing his job and lack of awareness can prevent an individual from seeking help. Despite these hurdles, there are strategies employers can implement to not only connect their employees with the help they need but to also improve productivity. Employers that address mental health issues have happier, healthier employees and see increased productivity and profits.

Confidential online depression screenings are a proven way to reach those in need and help direct them to appropriate assistance. For more than a decade, the WorkplaceResponse program has worked with organizations to address mental health issues in the workplace. Developed by the nonprofit Screening for Mental Health, WorkplaceResponse is a mental health education and screening program that easily integrates into existing employee assistance programs or enhances existing wellness initiatives hosted by human resource departments or employee assistance programs.

The program offers screenings for common mental health concerns, including depression, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, eating disorders and alcohol use disorders. Screenings are anonymous and engage employees in becoming active participants in their own well-being. Upon completion of a screening, employees are provided with immediate results and linked back to employee assistance program (EAP), local or company resources.

Health promotion programs can also have positive effects in the workplace. These programs serve as excellent tools to increase mental health awareness and educate workers on the signs and symptoms of depression. Managers and employees who can identify these symptoms can assist at-risk individuals with receiving the help they need.

National Depression Screening Day (NDSD), held annually on the Thursday of the first full week in October, is dedicated to raising awareness and screening people for depression and related mood and anxiety disorders. NDSD is the nation’s oldest voluntary, community-based screening program that gives access to validated screening questionnaires and provides referral information for treatment.

Oct. 8 marks the 25th year of the revolutionary campaign. This milestone allows for opportunities to begin the conversation about mental health in the workplace. Identifying workplace risk factors, taking action to reduce employee stress and initiating organizational wellness programs can be productive first steps.

Employers can make a difference by encouraging employees to take a quick, anonymous mental health assessment at http://helpyourselfhelpothers.org/ or by launching a 25-day wellness challenge. To encourage employees to take care of their mental health, a 25-day wellness challenge provides ideas and actions individuals can take to relieve stress, boost mindfulness and foster healthy behaviors. Examples include walking, cooking with family and taking a break from technology. Simple methods like the challenge can help increase awareness in the workplace.

It is time to address workplace depression. Effective screening tools are available, and treatment works. The early detection and prevention of mental health conditions can improve the lives of individual employees as well as the health of an organization.

6 Things to Do to Prevent Suicides

This year, for World Suicide Prevention Day, the theme is “Reaching Out to Save Lives” – a message all employers can use to let people know that everyone can play a role in suicide prevention. The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s Workplace Task Force members and the organizations they serve offer the top six things workplaces can do during the month of September to make prevention a health and safety priority:

naasp_trasparent

  1. Offer a Leadership Proclamation: “Not Another Life to Lose”

Members of executive leadership can take bold and visible positions declaring suicide prevention and mental health promotion critical workplace concerns. This proclamation can be in the form of a newsletter to employees or a video on a website.

  1. Highlight Mental Health Resources

Host a brown bag lunch program each day for the week. Invite employee assistance program (EAP) representatives or other local mental health professionals to offer educational session on stress, work-life balance, coping with depression or other related topics.

Offer a mental health fair where local suicide prevention, mental health or other wellness resources share more information and employees get a “passport” stamped for each one they visit. Completed passports go into a drawing for a prize.

Send resources to employees such as:

  1. Launch a Mental Wellness Task Force

A true comprehensive and sustained public health approach to prevention will take more than an awareness week or one-time training. To create significant change, a more strategic approach is needed. Start by pulling together a small group of stakeholders – people whose job titles reflect some level of relevance to this issue (i.e., wellness, HR, risk management, safety) and others who are passionate about prevention because it has touched their lives personally. Their task? To identify culturally relevant areas of strength and vulnerability for suicide within the organization and to develop a strategic approach to change.

Here are some resources:

  1. Leverage Social Media

During this week, companies can join the international conversation by posting on Twitter and Facebook.

  • Sample posts:
    • [Name of company or Twitter handle] makes #suicideprevention a health and safety priority #WSPD15
    • [Name of company or Twitter handle] We are doing our part to #preventsuicide during #NSPW. Everyone can play a role!
  • Hashtags:
    • National Suicide Prevention Week (Sept. 7-13)
      • #NSPW
      • #NSPW15
      • #SuicidePrevention
    • World Suicide Prevention Day (Sept. 10)
      • #WSPD
      • #WSPD15
    • Workplace
      • #WorkplaceMH
      • #WorkingMinds
    • Guidelines on social media and mental health.
  1. Honor Suicide Loss With Candle-Lighting Ceremony

How companies respond to the aftermath of suicide matters greatly. Grief and trauma support, thoughtful communication and compassionate leadership can help a workforce make the transition from immobilization to a bonded community.

Here are some resources:

  1. Donate to or Volunteer for Local or National Suicide Prevention Organizations

Engaging in community prevention efforts is a great way for employees to give back and to get to know the local resources available. Corporate investments in prevention programs and research will help us get ahead of the problem. Get involved!

Here are some resources: