Tag Archives: decision-making

An Overlooked Risk in Workers’ Comp

Sleep deprivation is an issue that is often overlooked, yet frequently the cause of decreased productivity, accidents, incidents and mistakes that cost companies billions of dollars each year, reports Circadian, a global leader in providing 24/7 workforce performance and safety solutions for businesses that operate around the clock.

Often, the experts at Circadian say, employers are unaware of the impact fatigue or sleep deprivation is having on their operation until a tragic accident occurs. Only then do managers ask the question: “What happened?”

Sleep deprivation is much more dangerous than you might realize. It’s not just annoying, like when an employee snoozes in a meeting or yawns during a conversation. Here are 10 real dangers associated with the overlooked problems in a sleep-deprived workforce:

  1. Decreased communication: When workers are tired, they become poor communicators. In one study, researchers noted that sleep-deprived individuals drop the intensity of their voices; pause for long intervals without apparent reason; enunciate very poorly or mumble instructions inaudibly; mispronounce, slur or run words together; and repeat themselves or lose their place in a sentence sequence.
  2. Performance deteriorates: Performance declines frequently include increased compensatory efforts on activities, decreased vigilance and slower response time. The average functional level of any sleep-deprived individual is comparable to the 9th percentile of non-sleep-deprived individuals. Workers must notice these performance declines, right? Not quite. In fact, sleep-deprived individuals have poor insight into their performance deficits. Also, the performance deficits worsen as time on task increases.
  3. Increased risk of becoming distracted: Sleep-deprived individuals have been shown to have trouble with maintaining focus on relevant cues, developing and updating strategies, keeping track of events and maintaining interest in outcomes and, instead, attend to activities judged to be non-essential. In fact, research suggests that there is a symbiotic relationship between sleep deprivation and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) because of the overlap in symptoms.
  4. Driving impairments: Because of federal regulations, the trucking industry is well aware of the driving impairments associated with sleep deprivation. However, plant managers are unaware of the ways in which sleep-deprived workers may be dangerously operating machinery (e.g. forklifts or dump trucks). In fact, 22 hours of sleep deprivation results in neurobehavioral performance impairments that are comparable to a 0.08% blood alcohol level (legally drunk in the U.S.).
  5. Increased number of errors: The cognitive detriments of sleep deprivation increase concurrently with a worker’s time on a given task, resulting in an increased number of errors. These errors include mistakes of both commission (i.e., performing an act that leads to harm) and omission (i.e., not performing an expected task), which can wreak havoc at any work facility. Errors especially are likely in subject-paced tasks in which cognitive slowing occurs and with tasks that are time-sensitive, which cause increases in cognitive errors.
  6. Poor cognitive assimilation and memory: Short-term and working memory declines are associated with sleep deprivation and result in a decreased ability to develop and update strategies based on new information, along with the ability to remember the temporal sequence of events.
  7. Inappropriate moodines: Inappropriate, mood-related behavior often occurs in outbursts, as most sleep-deprived individuals are often quiet and socially withdrawn. However, a single one of these outbursts can be enough to destroy the positive culture of a work environment and cause an HR nightmare. These behavioral outbursts can include irritability, impatience, childish humor, lack of regard for normal social conventions, inappropriate interpersonal behaviors and unwillingness to engage in forward planning.
  8. Greater risk-taking behavior: Brain imaging studies have shown that sleep deprivation was associated with increased activation of brain regions related to risky decision making, while areas that control rationale and logical thinking show lower levels of activation. In fact, sleep deprivation increases one’s expectation of gains while diminishing the implications of losses. What does this mean for your workers? Sleep-deprived workers may be making riskier decisions, ignoring the potential negative implications and taking gambles in scenarios in which the losses outweigh the benefits.
  9. Inability to make necessary adjustments: Flexible thinking, preservation on thoughts and actions, updating strategies based on new information, ability to think divergently and innovation are all hurt by sleep deprivation. A worker may be unable to fill a leadership role on request when sleep-deprived, resulting in a frustrated management team.
  10. Effects of sleep deprivation compound across nights: Four or more nights of partial sleep deprivation containing less than seven hours of sleep per night can be equivalent to a total night of sleep deprivation. A single night of total sleep deprivation can affect your functioning for as long as two weeks. To your brain, sleep is money, and the brain is the best accountant.

According to Circadian, when you have sleep-deprived or fatigued workers, productivity levels and quality of work will be compromised. Furthermore, you create an environment where it becomes not a matter of if your workplace will have an accident or incident but a matter of when, and to what magnitude.

Sleep deprivation is no laughing matter, no matter how frequently our society treats the issue light-heartedly. Eventually, our biological drive to compensate for sleep deprivation wins, and the loser might be your workers, your employer or even you.

The expectation is that employees return to work in January feeling recharged and ready to perform their best. In reality, one in every five workers is sleep-deprived, and those who sleep poorly are 54% more likely to experience stress in their job, according to a new study from international employee health and performance organization Global Corporate Challenge (GCC).

The report, “Waking Up To the Sleep Problem Every Employer Is Facing,” also found that 93% of poor sleepers were more likely to display workplace fatigue, a common symptom of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) – the condition proven to increase risks of absenteeism, accidents and injury in the workplace.

“Independent research undertaken on GCC participants in the 2014 challenge demonstrates that sleep improves with increased step count in a linear fashion,” said Dr. David Batman, director of research, FCDP. “There are significant increases in productivity and reduction in fatigue and stress levels at work and home. Extrapolation of these results leads to an obvious conclusion that simple exercise improves sleep, and the combined result will be an increase in personal and business performance.”

The results come from the health and performance leaders’ first series of GCC Insights papers, based on aggregate data drawn from employees in 185 countries. With more than 1.5 million people having now been through the program, the data sample is one of the largest, most diverse of its kind.

This GCC Insights paper also provides practical recommendations for employers who recognize that their workers’ mental and physical health inextricably is linked to business success – a realization that, for many, signals a need to rethink outdated well-being strategies in exchange for a longer-term commitment to employee health.

“The cost of poor sleep habits among employee populations has been grossly underestimated; it is having profound consequences for productivity and health,” said Glenn Riseley, founder and president at the GCC. “Luckily, enlightened employers are now changing their cultures so that sleep is no longer seen as a luxury but as a priority.”

Decision Dysfunction in Corporate America

Nancy Newbee is the newest trainee for LOCO (Large Old Company). She was hired because she is bright, articulate, well-educated and motivated. She is in her second week of training.

Her orders include: “We’ll teach you all you need to know. Sammy Supervisor will monitor your every action and coordinate your training. Don’t take a step without his clearance. When he’s busy, just read through the procedures manual.”

Nancy is already frustrated by this training process but is committed to following the rules.

Upon arriving at work today, Nancy discovers the kitchen is on fire! As instructed, she rushes to Sammy Supervisor. Interrupting him, she says, “There’s a major problem!”

Sammy is obviously disturbed by this interruption in his routine. “Nancy, my schedule will not allow me to work with you until this afternoon; go back to the conference room and continue studying the procedures.”

“But, Mr. Supervisor, this is a major problem!” Nancy pleads.

“But nothing! I’m busy. We’ll discuss it this afternoon. If it can’t wait, go see the department head,” Sam says.

Nancy rushes to the office of Billy Big and shouts, “Mr. Big, we have a major problem, and Mr. Sam said to see you!” Mr. Big states politely, “I’m busy now …,” all the while wondering why Sam hires these excitable airheads.

“But, Mr. Big, the building…,” Nancy interrupts.

“Nancy, see my secretary for an appointment or call maintenance if it’s a building problem,” Mr. Big says impatiently, thinking, “Where does Sam find these characters?”

Near panic, Nancy calls maintenance. The line is busy. As a last resort, Nancy calls Ruth Radar, the senior secretary in the accounting department. Everyone has told her that Ruth really runs this place. She can get anything done.

“Ruth Radar, may I help you?” is the response on the phone.

“Miss Radar, this is Nancy, the new trainee. The building is on fire! What should I do?” Nancy shouts through her tears.

“Nancy, call 911!” Ruth says calmly.

Of course, this dysfunction is a ridiculous example. Or is it?

Assuming you are the boss, try this eight-question test:

  1. In your business, do you hire the best and brightest and then instruct them not to think, act or do anything during their training except as you tell them to do?
  2. Do you promise training but substitute reading of procedure manuals?
  3. Do you create barriers to communications, interaction and effectiveness by scheduling the new employee’s problems and inquiries to the busy schedules of your other personnel?
  4. Do you and your staff ignore what new employees are saying?
  5. Is the process more important than the result? Does the urgent get in the way of the important?
  6. Do layers of bureaucracy between you, your employees and customers interfere with contact, communications and results?
  7. Is “Ruth Radar” running your shop?
  8. Do you have any fires burning in your office?

If you answered “no” to all of these questions, congratulations!

Now go back and try again. The perfect business would have eight “no” answers, but very few businesses are perfect. If you are like LOCO (a large old company), you might be so far out of touch with your trainees, employees and customers that you won’t hear about a fire until it starts to burn your desk.

Look back at IBM, GM and Sears in the late 1980s. These were kings of their jungles. Yet all nearly burned to the ground. Many thousands of employees were terminated, profits ended and stock values fell. If you would have talked to any of these terminated employees you would have learned that the fire had burned for a long time and that many people had tried to sound the alarm.

Remember the large old insurance companies that are no longer here – Continental, Reliance, etc. Did their independent agents smell the smoke? Did the leadership of these carriers ignore the alarm?

Sam Walton, who had reasonable success in business during his lifetime, once said, “There is only one boss – the customer. Customers can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down, simply by spending their money somewhere else.”

Sam was right. In your business, do you or Nancy have the most direct contact with the customer – the ultimate boss? If Nancy has the most contact, is she adequately trained, motivated and monitored? Is she providing feedback to you? Are you listening?

Take one minute to draw a picture of your organization. Are you, as the boss, at the pinnacle? Are Nancy and her fellow trainees at the base? Is it prudent to have the least experienced personnel closest to the customers?

Your organization was formed to meet the needs of customers. You exist to serve these same customers. Where are these customers in the organizational chart? Did you forget them? How much distance is there between you (as boss) and the customers?

Does this pyramid model facilitate the free flow of information between you and the customers or does it buffer you from the thoughts and feelings of the real boss (the customer)? In your business, is the customer and her problem seen as an interruption of the work or the very reason for your existence?

If your customers voted tomorrow, who would be retained? Who would be fired?

Think about it! Do you dare to ask?

Creating a Customer-Insight Strategy

Too few companies have a customer strategy, let alone a customer-insight (CI) strategy. At least, that’s my experience.

In fact, many business strategies that I’ve seen, which seek to pepper their presentation with customer language, are really channel strategies or product strategies that reflect the silos in that business.

This is unfortunate, as most CEOs would acknowledge the critical importance of having their business understand, acquire, satisfy and retain customers (ideally, converting them into advocates). But perhaps the lack of customer insight in strategies reflects that may boardrooms have not had an empowered and articulate customer leader (or, better still, CI leader) to identify the need and drive the change.

As a small contribution to fill this gap, let me share a few reflections on what I have found helpful to consider when creating a customer-insight strategy.

At its simplest, strategy is just a series of decisions about “what you are going to do.” This mindset can help avoid too much theorizing with pretty diagrams and ensure your strategy leads to an implementation plan that can be executved. As a simple framework, it can help to consider three overlapping sets that you need to consider for a CI strategy:

Strategic Alignment: Although a CI strategy can inform and guide business and marketing strategies (from an understanding of consumers, your target market, their perceptions, unmet needs and channel usage), normally those exist prior to creating a CI strategy. So, a first priority is to ensure alignment.

How can customer insight help achieve the goals of the business strategy? What does the business need to understand better to deliver the marketing strategy? How can the work that aligns best with top strategic priorities be prioritized for the CI function. Is there other work that the CI function is doing that can be stopped or reduced given its low alignment with strategic priorities? All these elements should be thought through to decide what is included within CI strategy.

Your business and marketing strategy have likely been shaped, at least in early stages by PEST (political, economic, socio-cultural and technological), SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and and threats) and other tools to analyze internal and external factors. Similarly, in summarizing what the CI strategy should be (aligned to business and marketing strategies) it is useful to see what use of CI is working for others businesses (here, lessons can often by learned outside your sector) and summarize what CI work has been most effective previously for you (on the basis of commercial return and improved customer feedback).

Both of these approaches should help identify priority work areas where CI can make a difference and help deliver the business and marketing strategies.

Operational Effectiveness: This is all about organization and processes. How does the CI function operate?

Once again, it is useful to both look internally, capturing what has really happened already, and externally (this time for best practice models). Given the relative immaturity of CI in academic terms and lack of common language or focus from “marketing experts,”‘ it can be hard to find the textbook answer for the customer insight best practice model. However, I have found a few of the benchmarking models used by technology research companies and marketing professional bodies useful and have produced my own (on the basis of 13 years experience in creating and leading such functions).

However you come by a best practice model with which you are comfortable, your next step should be the familiar approach for gap analysis. Summarize your current practice, compare and contrast with the best-practice model and then prioritize the gaps you find. Prioritization here needs to be informed by what you will be using your CI function to achieve (as summarized in the strategic alignment section). This review and gap analysis should consider not just the processes for getting different items of work delivered but also the organizational structure of the team. Despite some leaders claiming the structure does not matter if you have a unifying vision and the right attitude, all my experience teaches me that it does. Human beings are inherently tribal, and the quality of CI output is strongly affected by inter-disciplinary cooperation.

People Leadership: That mention of departmental structure brings us neatly onto focusing on the people in your CI team(s). Too often, strategy documents, even if they manage to translate the conceptual into the practical, fail to then consider the people side of change. To deliver the priorities identified in your strategic alignment review requires not just appropriate structures and effective processes but also the right people and culture. A good place to start can be a review of the current people in roles, comparing them with the ideal roles and skills required to deliver the work needed. Such a review should seek to consider people’s generic competencies and wider skills than they may be asked to use in current roles, as well as critically assess their attitude and fit with the team.

But beyond just the right individuals, success will depend on those people coming together to form effective teams, and that is more about culture than what is written down. I like to think of culture as “what happens ’round here when people aren’t being watched.” Various approaches have been tried to impose or encourage the culture wanted in a team, but I’ve found little works as well as empowering the people themselves to create the culture in which they want to work. An effective people leader is needed, who can communicate a clear vision and make decisions, but the leader will often be most successful when working with suitably skilled individuals to together define the team culture they want and how that can be encouraged. Truly listening to the wisdom of those doing the work, recognizing and rewarding the behavior sought and giving time to developing people and fixing environmental irritants will all encourage this.

None of this is easy. But being in a position to articulate to your team and your boss and the board a coherent customer-insight strategy (which explains how it enables business objectives, operates effectively and gets the best out of the people in the function) can be powerful.

Data Analytics Comes of Age for Agents

Sitting down for lunch with one of our top independent agents, I asked him about his business.  

“Things are great – we’re totally paperless now!” he responded triumphantly.

“So what are you doing with all of the data you’re collecting?” I asked.

“Oh, I’m too small to do any of that stuff,” he said with a shrug.

“You’re not,” I said. “In fact, it’s a powerful way for you to generate more business. Let me show you how….”

“Data analytics” sounds like rocket science—sophisticated, expensive, intimidating and beyond the reach of the typical independent agency. It isn't. Data analytics is simply the analysis of data that allows a person to make a better decision than they could without data.

The challenge occurs when there is so much data available that it becomes difficult to determine what information is relevant and what is not. It becomes even harder when the data is not stored in a way that can be easily analyzed.

Today’s technology allows people to analyze huge amounts of data in whatever form. Sophisticated software can identify patterns and relationships between millions of pieces of information that provide better insight into a subject. This is commonly referred to as “big data” analytics.

Don't get overwhelmed by these terms or the complexity of the algorithms used to analyze data. Just remember that the objective is to use data so you and your agency can make better decisions. Here are the key steps to improve your agency's performance:

Step 1:  Understand what you have

Your agency contains a treasure trove of information about your existing clients and potential customers.

Before you can even begin to run a data analytics program, spend time understanding the data you already collect. Start by creating a spreadsheet with all of the data you collect when you onboard a new client — for example, birthdate, home and work address.

Add information you collect as part of the underwriting process. For example, if you write a BOP policy for a client, capture all the additional data an insurer needs to evaluate the risk — the number of employees, store locations and industry.

When this spreadsheet is completed, you will discover the sheer volume of data you already collect about your clients.

Step 2: Understand what you want

Who are my most profitable clients? Are clients more profitable if I write both their commercial and personal lines insurance? How many policies per household do I need to maintain a high retention rate? How can I best target new clients? What type of people are my best referral sources? What marketing programs generate the best leads?

If you think you know the answer to these questions because you've asked them yourself, think again. Most agency owners base their answer on individual experience. That's no longer good enough. Insurance sales and marketing has transformed from an art to a science.

While the data you collect is extremely valuable, data analytics tools also allow you to incorporate outside data into your analysis. What information would you like to have about an existing client or a potential customer? What information would you like to know about a certain area or region?

Identify your “data gaps” — information you don't have but would like to have about a client or a prospect. This might include their net worth, whether they own another home or their business affiliations.  Consider any information you would like to have about a specific geographic area or other external information that would be helpful in allowing you to attract and retain clients.

Capturing all of this additional “outside” data is beyond the capability of any individual agency. But today there are companies that do just that. Find one that offers subscription- or transaction-based solutions, with little or no start-up costs, that are easily accessible by using their secure website. Find a platform you can use any time to plug in or access the data you want.

The data relationships that you build will allow you to create a strategic advantage. Stay away from cookie-cutter solutions that just provide “answers” to data questions. They don't allow you to differentiate the results of the data analysis.

Step 3: Put the data to work

Does your agency management system have a data analytics feature or tool? If it does, subscribe to it. If it doesn’t, demand that the vendor offer such a tool.

If your agency management system doesn't have a data analytics tool, reach out to the insurance company you write a lot of business with and ask if you can partner with them on a data analytics project. Offer to share your information if they will analyze your book of business. Make sure you play a key role in defining the data to be analyzed, and most importantly make sure you define the hypothesis or data relationship you are looking to uncover.

Take action

Today, customer acquisition and retention takes place in real time, or close to it. The more information you have about current and potential customers, the better you will be able to address their needs when and where they want it. That's why you need to embrace data analytics — it gives you the information you need, when you need it.

If you are like most agencies, you’ve already done the hard part by getting rid of your paper files and moving to an electronic agency management system platform. Now you need to start using your data.  You have a great opportunity to become a sophisticated marketer and drive better performance and growth out of your agency.

What are you waiting for?

Breaking Through The Barrier Of Hardnosed Workers, Part 3

Turning The Corner
Admittedly, Part 1 and Part 2 of this series may be a bit discouraging to the solution-seeking reader. But as a wise professor states, “There is no implementation without, first, evaluation.”

So what has our evaluation revealed?

First, the dysfunctional nature of the average hardnosed worker employed in traditionally change-resistant work sectors is representative of his greater employment family, both labor and management. It is not the portrait of an isolated employee or two. The nature is systemic, as are its crippling effects.

Second, the extent of potential behavioral dysfunction in hardnosers is staggering. The research data points past the occasional whimsical, inane antics of the passive-aggressive worker who simply annoys others. It directs us to the darkly devious behavior of someone, or a bevy of someones, who is self-destructive, emotionally unengaged, and constantly looking to jump off the ship after lighting the fuse that may blow it up.

Third, management has largely failed in its attempts to wrestle control of the workforce away from hardnosers. Traditional quick-action employee management strategies lack the foundational understanding of both the cause of defiant behavior and the dysfunctional team dynamics that it creates.

Last, management has often chosen the wrong method to seize control of hardnosers. The preferred tactic has been to tighten control through the repeated issuance of compliance standards. Such “what to do” and “how to do it” standards stiffen the hardnosed worker’s resolve to reject management’s ploys.

Engineering consultant Kevin Sorbello fittingly compares the change-resistant workforce to a dysfunctional family in which “those making the rules unconsciously see themselves as adults in charge of children.” Conversely, he notes that workers of lower rank see themselves as being “treated like children by unfit elitists. The fact that this scenario is so ubiquitous,” he says, “is disheartening.”

In light of this stark portrayal, what can be done to heal a defiant and dysfunctional employment family?

Capitalize On Dysfunction
One word points us down the right path. It keeps cropping up [five times above]. The word is dysfunctional. There’s a reason it is our key word.

Dysfunction brings with it opportunity. The same weaknesses that define dysfunctional workers are the ones that open the door for us to help them personally and to improve the cooperative nature of the entire workforce.

But this can’t happen until we acknowledge several hard-to-believe truths about the nature of hardnosed workers. These are beliefs gleaned by the author after four decades of listening to, observing, profiling, and helping dysfunctional people.

1. Hardnosers really want to improve.
They are really not into self-flagellation, though they expect it to happen (defeatism) — they’d rather have the opposite: success.

2. Hardnosers are stuck and need a push.
They really don’t know how to solve their own problems, nor why they are stuck in a defeatist rut.

3. Hardnosers want simple honesty.
They will not trust you until you first demonstrate to them your complete honesty.

4. Hardnosers desire compassion, not charity.
They innately sense the difference — one is considered condescending and offensive to them; the other is acceptable.

5. Hardnosers respond best to old-fashioned “tough love.”
They desire hard boundaries, particularly those that help them achieve hard-to-reach goals.

6. Hardnosers want you to earnestly listen to them.
They want to tell you vital information about themselves — their real and felt needs — that enables you to help them mature.

It is difficult for some skeptics to embrace these beliefs. It is easier to adopt the attitude of one Cleveland-area business owner who believes that “most employees with bad attitudes come that way and it is not up to you to be a social worker.” To him, any alternative to improving the quality of workers other than perfecting the hiring and firing process is “silly,” even if personnel turnover costs are astronomical.

Safety officer Ken Malcolm at Safety & More P/L begs to differ. He says, “Hardnosed negatives can become hardnosed positives.” The key, he says, is trust.

Malcolm states that trust does not exist because “the past experiences [of workers] have not been good.” He suggests that workers have rarely been exposed to managers “who put value on worker input.” Perhaps they once worked for a grumpy guy in Cleveland. More likely, they’ve been jaded by repeated exposure to the Cycle of Rejection described in Part 2 of this series.

Agree with it or not, the path to profitability involves helping hardnosers cure their dysfunctional behavior, a task that starts with listening to what they say about themselves and about control-minded authorities.

Listening For Needs
Within the well-worn contentious discourse proffered by hardnosers is an easily recognizable admission of their foibles.

  • I have trouble accepting authority of any kind.
  • I am emotionally cold and uncaring.
  • I often say the wrong thing in the wrong way.
  • I don’t trust anyone enough to give them my loyalty (everyone is out to get me).
  • I am not a good team player.

You can also hear their pleas for help.

  • Help us accept authority, not persistently fight back.
  • Help us live emotionally healthy lives, not crawl into an emotional shell.
  • Help us develop better interpersonal skills, not alienate others.
  • Help us bond with each other and the company, not be disloyal.
  • Help us be better team players, not self-interested individuals.

These needs should sound familiar — they directly correspond to the “snapshot” of a hardnosed worker described in Part 1 of this series.

A hardnosed worker is a self-destructive, emotionally self-centered, uncontrollable person who would rather cut-and-run than commit.

From this snapshot, the human needs that it reveals, and the failure of traditional means to change hardnosed behavior, you know that there is only one action plan — one line of attack — that will result in positively changing a resistant workforce into a cooperative one. But, like the hardnosed Cleveland businessman, you might have trouble admitting it.

You have to help them develop the relational skills that they lack.

But don’t let this series tell you the obvious, though it bears repeating. Let the desperate general manager from Part 1 of this series say it. He’s the one who in 1992 initially linked the characteristics of a juvenile delinquent to the antics of his hardnosed employees. The assistance he sought from a troubled youth expert is as difficult as it is simple.

“I simply want you to help my people treat each other as people,” he asked.

He knew the problem pointed to a lack of interpersonal skills. So do you. And so do the perpetrators, who secretly want your help.

But how do you provide assistance without risking further rejection?

Using Safety To Change People
Job safety is the only joint partnership with management to which the hardnoser has ceded a modicum of control and cooperation. It is the only “face saving” venue in which he consents to [non-craft skill] personal development. To him, change for safety’s sake is grudgingly agreeable.

With safety training comes the opportunity to change the hardnoser, if the correct approach is utilized. Felt needs should be front-and-center — the odor of command, control, and compliance should be reduced.

John Bennett, VP of M.C. Dean, urges us to remember that “it is not about the system, regulations, nor policy or procedure. It is all about the people.”

Ill-conceived training strategies in which personal development is added-on to standard compliance training rarely work. Hardnosers are stubborn, not stupid. They can sense a convenient manipulative end run by management. Ever hear them call leadership training “charm school?”

To achieve human change requires a more carefully crafted safety training strategy than most organizations currently employ. Such a strategy demands a more need-sensitive safety management system.

What is recommended here extends beyond simple supplements to standardized compliance training programs. What is needed is a radical redesign of safety thinking in dealing with a sub-culture of resistance.

Above all, one hard-learned lesson about securing cooperation from defiant people must be remembered. You must meet their felt needs before they will fully give you what you want — compliance and control. If safety doesn’t do this, you remain stuck in the sink hole of opposition, forever containing resistance rather than correcting it.

Life Skills Are Felt Needs
A felt need is simply anything people consciously lack and desire. As noted, the hardnoser consciously but quietly desires self-improvement, particularly in life skills.

One example is the need of supervisors to learn practical leadership skills. As new supervisors quickly rise from the lower ranks of organizations, many supervisors suffer from the lack of leadership development inherent in on-the-job training.

Joe Johnson says that new supervisors are likely to be “given a ‘white hat,’ put in charge, and sent out in the organization with instructions to make things happen safely.” But of the leadership creation process, Johnson asks, “What ‘tools’ have these individuals been provided to insure he or she will be a good safety manager?”

In addition to leadership skills, other life skill needs that are likely felt by hardnosers of all ranks include:

  • Interpersonal communication skills (all aspects)
    • Accurate listening skills
    • Accurate shaping of the message to the listener
    • Accurate delivery of the message for acceptance
    • Accurate use of reflective listening, clarification
  • Relationship building
  • Behavioral awareness and pattern recognition
  • Anger management/tolerance/empathy
  • Team building
  • Critical thinking and decision-making
  • Coaching and mentoring

Under the confines of employee development and safety training, we have regrettably postponed meeting these needs until it is too late, after the worker feels under-appreciated. Properly, these are the needs you should start meeting at the beginning of new hire orientation.

What Do I Do?
The practical answer to the initial question — What should I do to change hardnosed workers? — is as basic as it sounds complex.

To change a hardnosed work force, you should implement a hybrid training program that simultaneously combines traditional safety-related training subjects with topics that develop the character of the hardnoser in their expressed area of needs.

The key is seamless simultaneous integration. Safety and human development should be taught at the same time, not as separate courses.

To avoid the Cycle of Rejection discussed in Part 2, the hardnoser must not feel that personal manipulation is the purpose of the training, nor should it be. Yet he should also walk away with a sense of obligation to practice (note: different than “comply with”) what is taught.

To make a life-changing combination of safety and personal development training workable requires two organizational commitments.

1. The organization must improve its quality of training.
A higher level of training is required, as is a better quality instructor skilled in safety, communications and human development. Revised curricula must be employed. Cattle-call training must be replaced with a caring personal attitude.

2. The organization must meld its safety and operation cultures.
A unified work culture is required, one which leaves hardnosers no wiggle room for discarding their training lessons under the excuse of “safety behavior” versus “operational behavior.” Operations cannot be allowed to deprive the hardnoser of training’s human development gains.

John Bennett underscores the mistake of trying to create a safety culture within an existing company culture in order to change people. He states that the tactic “is incongruent with the overall mission of the company.” Bennett suggests that “building upon the existing culture and simply inserting the safety aspect” is a more sensible way to build a unified work force. “Involving people in a sincere way,” he says, “will produce better results than were heretofore imaginable.” The hardnoser agrees wholeheartedly.

The Essentials
For the best results, a hybrid safety training program should immediately focus on the greatest needs of the hardnoser: interpersonal communication skills, emotional openness and honesty, and relational teamwork. All these needs share a common denominator. They point to the hardnoser’s fundamental lack of behavioral understanding.

Rarely are hardnosers properly educated about behavior — they do not bring such knowledge with them to the job. Most struggle with discerning why people do what they do — many ascribe the wrong motive to other’s behavior. It’s easy for hardnosers to fall into the Cycle of Rejection.

As explained in Part 2, answering the why question is vital to securing the hardnoser’s cooperation. If you desire to tear down the walls of resistance in your work force, here’s what you need to know.

  • If you help the hardnoser understand his unique behavior temperament and its affects on him — why he is prone to repeat certain behavior patterns — he will call you a friend.
  • If you show him why others act as they do because of their unique behavior temperaments, he will call you a good friend.
  • If you teach him how to build productive relationships with others despite their differences in temperament, he will call you his best buddy.
  • If you do none of the above yet try to change him, he will think you are simply attempting to control him. We’ve seen where that leads.

It is essential to integrate a simple behavior paradigm into every aspect of safety training. Uncomplicated behavior assessment profiles like the DISC or the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® can serve this purpose. These are accurate, easily integrated “tools” that produce the type of behavioral understanding needed by hardnosers and non-hardnosers alike.

But this is no shill for the traditional haphazard use of behavior profile tools to soothe the ruffles of an agitated work force or as a guest speaker’s play toy. This is a call to deeply interweave two narratives — safety management and human development — on a consistent basis to meet the targeted needs of employees.

This author will attest to the instant magic brought by behavioral self-discovery through platforms like the DISC or MBTI. One unforgettable incident occurred when the cigar-chomping director of one company’s division first saw the results of his DISC self-analysis. The director’s cigar dropped from his mouth as he stood up, staggered about the training room with his analysis, and shouted, “This is me! This is me! This is freakin’ me.” Presto.

But that momentary magic is useless unless it is converted into tangible results while sustained within a framework of a safety training program that is designed to simultaneously control and change lives.

To do this requires a bold commitment from executive managers that are tired of butting their heads against behavioral barriers. Let the general manager mentioned in Part 1 remind us again that the alternative, letting hardnosers drag the company down, is “not an option.”

What this commitment looks like in practicality, and the results that it can accomplish, will be the subject of Part 4 of this series.

Bibliography

“Focus On Teamwork, Attitude Improves Quality And Safety.” The Waterways Journal. April 25, 1994: 41-44

Newton, Ron. No Jerks On The Job. Irving, TX. PenlandScott Publishers, 2010.

Riddle, Glenden P. An Evaluation Of The Effectiveness Of Stress Camping Through The Use Of The Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis Exam. Research Project. Dallas Theological Seminary, December 1978.

Taylor, Robert. Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis Manual. Thousand Oaks: Psychological Publications, Inc., 1992.