Tag Archives: credit score

A ‘Credit Score’ for Your Cyber Risk?

It’s safe to say that the vast majority of companies can, and probably should, be doing a lot more to improve the security posture of their business networks.

What most organizations probably do not realize is that there is an entity paying very close attention to just who is consistently following security best practices—and who isn’t.

That entity is BitSight Technologies, a six-year-old risk assessment vendor that does this by analyzing a variety of sources that monitor which companies regularly update encryption certificates, patch system vulnerabilities in a timely manner and generally adhere to other best security practices.

Keeping tabs on security

BitSight goes through all of this trouble to assign a security rating to each company it reviews. Ranging from 200 to 900, a BitSight security rating is much like a credit score. BitSight has issued security ratings for some 80,000 companies, and is adding 500 more each week.

Why does BitSight do this, and, perhaps more importantly, why should any organization care about a BitSight security rating? Two reasons: third-party partnerships and cyber insurance.

See also: Urgent Need on ‘Silent’ Cyber Risks  

First of all, BitSight’s primary customers are large enterprises that factor security ratings into decisions on which third-party suppliers they will choose to do business with, says Jake Olcott, vice president of business development at BitSight.

“Today, if you’re a first party doing business with a third party, the idea of doing cyber diligence prior to entering into a business relationship is certainly on your mind,” Olcott told me, when we met at the RSA cybersecurity conference recently.

Monitoring business partners

Olcott says, “Once you’ve decided to enter into that business relationship, you also care about the cybersecurity performance of that third party during the lifetime of the business relationship. That’s really why a lot of folks are using our ratings today—to continuously monitor their critical third parties mostly throughout the lifetime of the business relationship.”

I asked Olcott if third-party suppliers were clued in to this trend, and thus finding themselves compelled to improve their security postures in order to earn higher security ratings.

“We’re absolutely seeing that,” he says. “Organizations want to represent good cybersecurity hygiene to their customers, and one way to do that is by showing a quantitative, objective measurement of their cybersecurity posture.”

The second reason BitSight’s security ratings are gaining traction is because of the rapidly emerging cyber insurance market. Allied Market Research projects that the cyber insurance market is on track to climb to $14 billion by 2022, representing a compound annual growth rate of 28% during its forecast period of 2016-2022.

Help for insurance companies

Clearly, a lot of companies would love to offset rising cyber exposures by purchasing a cyber liability policy. However, cyber risks are unlike any other business risk to come down the pike previously. Cyber risks are complex, constantly evolving and seemingly impossible to quantify. BitSight is in the vanguard of security vendors focused on solving that problem, something that’s necessary for the cyber insurance market to fully bloom.

“Seven of the 10 largest cybersecurity insurance companies are using BitSight ratings to underwrite cybersecurity insurance policies,” Olcott says. “An insurance company will collect information from the applicant about their cybersecurity posture, and also look at a BitSight security rating. Taking those data points together, they will come to a premium assessment for the applicant and issue a policy.”

See also: Protecting Institutions From Cyber Risks  

I asked Olcott to explain how a good vs. poor rating actually affects premium prices and policy coverages. He said:

“I would say a good rating in our system would be 700 and above, and I would look at it this way: An organization that we rate a 500 or lower is actually five times more likely to experience a breach than an organization that we rate a 700 or above. So if you’re an insurance company, it’s not that you wouldn’t underwrite a policy for an organization that is a 500 or lower. It’s that you want to understand the risk that you’re taking. You don’t want your entire book of business to be of companies that are performing below a 500.”

This post originally appeared on ThirdCertainty.

3 Money Mistakes Newlyweds Make

Being a newlywed is awesome. I reflect on that season of my life as one filled with joy and anticipation. Sure, that first year of marriage was full of challenges, enormous adjustments and unexpected changes, but on the whole it was great.

We found such relief in finally being married and out of engagement. Engagement is a funny time. You often take on new priorities and responsibilities you’ve never had before (like part-time event planner), and that can wear on you and the relationship after awhile. Engagement is meant to be a temporary phase in life, and most friends I know, myself included, have been thrilled to see an end to it — the lists, planning, preparation, etc. In the midst of all of the planning and celebrating, the topic of money is often overlooked (aside from the wedding budget). Yet studies tell us money is a top cause of conflict and divorce among couples. Money can be hard to talk about. Our culture has made money-talk a taboo subject, which can make it all the more difficult to start talking about money (regularly) with another person, especially if you were used to keeping your money matters private for so many years.

Here are a few money mistakes I see newlyweds make. Regardless of how long you’ve been married, though, it’s always important to check in and make sure you’re not letting the important things fall by the wayside.

1. Forgetting to Update Important Plans and Documents

When you start a job and enroll in your employer’s various benefits, you are prompted to assign beneficiaries to things like your 401(k), group life insurance, even an emergency contact in some instances. Getting married means it’s time to review these beneficiary designations.

You should also review current insurance policies and see if you need to add your spouse to the plan or review your coverage entirely. If you are both on individual health insurance plans through work, it’s worth comparing the cost of keeping your individual plans versus one of you joining the other’s plan. It’s possible you’ll save money by being on the same plan. When evaluating the cost, consider monthly premiums, deductibles, co-insurance and co-pays.

If you happen to have estate-planning documents like wills, health care proxies, living wills, etc., these documents also warrant review and updating when you get married.

2. Overlooking the Need to Get Organized

I know, it’s one more administrative thing that’s not fun to think about or act on, but it is important to be organized. If you don’t talk about it, habits will naturally form, and you’ll likely end up with unnecessary confusion and stress, which can lead to conflict. Don’t be scrappy with your finances. I survive by being scrappy as a parent (I’m a mom of two toddlers). But this ability doesn’t translate as well with finances.

Try this: Sit down and list out all the accounts each of you have and then talk about which accounts you want to join, leave separate, combine, close, etc. Simplicity is a wonderful thing. Decide which account(s) you’ll use for routine expenses, where you’ll keep your emergency savings, longer-term savings and investments. Even if you plan to keep accounts separate, have this conversation so it’s intentional and there’s no confusion about how bills and shared expenses will be handled.

You can also make your credit reports a part of this process — so you both have an understanding of each other’s credit history, and create a plan for building better credit, or maintaining your great credit if you have it. If you’re not familiar with your credit reports, you may find them to be overwhelming at first — here’s a guide to deciphering your credit report. You can get your free credit reports once a year from each of the three major credit reporting agencies, and you can get a free credit report summary on Credit.com, updated monthly.

3. Avoiding Money Talks

Money is a leading cause of conflict and stress for couples, which can be enough to discourage some people from discussing the topic at all. If you learn to talk about money early on (especially when times are good and emotions aren’t running high), you’ll be prepared when money issues arise.

Talking about money feels like creating a new habit. Sometimes you just have to start doing it, even before you’re comfortable doing so, and allow the habit to take shape.

Here are a few starting points for your conversations about money:

  • Your history with money (What lessons about money did you learn as a child?)
  • Current stress points with money
  • Goals you hope to achieve with your money
  • Expectations for your current lifestyle and how you want to use your money
  • Spending habits (Where do you spend money the easiest, with most resistance?)

A Word of Encouragement

Financial unity and stability with your spouse is a process. You don’t have to have all the answers or all of the kinks worked out from the beginning.

If you and your spouse have different approaches to money, (how you spend versus save, what you value, etc.), this doesn’t have to mean never-ending conflict. It’s possible you both need to learn to compromise, and pushing each other toward a middle ground may be the healthiest thing for both of you. And that’s one of the great benefits of marriage — the messy but beautiful process of refining each other and growing together in ways you never could alone.

This article originally appeared on Credit.com and was written by Julie Ford.

Confusion Reigns on Predictive Analytics

It seems everyone in workers’ compensation wants analytics. At the same time, a lot of confusion persists about what analytics is and what it can contribute. Expectations are sometimes unclear and often unrealistic. Part of the confusion is that analytics can exist in many forms.

Analytics is a term that encompasses a broad range of data mining and analysis activities. The most common form of analytics is straightforward data analysis and reporting. Other predominant forms are predictive modeling and predictive analytics.

Most people are already doing at least some form of analytics and portraying their results for their unique audiences. Analytics represented by graphic presentations are popular and often informative, but they do not change behavior and outcomes by themselves.

See Also: Analytics and Survival in the Data Age

Predictive modeling uses advanced mathematical tools such as various configurations of regression analysis or even more esoteric mathematical instruments. Predictive modeling looks for statistically valid probabilities about what the future holds within a given framework. In workers’ compensation, predictive modeling is used to forecast which claims will be the most problematic and costly from the outset of the claim. It is also the most sophisticated and usually the most costly predictive methodology.

Predictive analytics lies somewhere between data analysis and predictive modeling. It can be distinguished from predictive modeling in that it uses historic data to learn from experience what to expect in the future. It is based on the assumption that future behavior of an individual or situation will be similar to what has occurred in the past.

One of the best-known applications of predictive analytics is credit scoring, used throughout the financial services industry. Analysis of a customer’s credit history, payment history, loan application and other conditions is used to rank-order individuals by their likelihood of making future credit payments on time. Those with the highest scores are ranked highest and are the best risks. That is why a high credit risk score is important to purchasers and borrowers.

Similarly, workers’ compensation claim data can be collected, integrated and analyzed from bill review, claims system, utilization review, pharmacy (PBM) and claim outcome information to score and rank-order treating physicians’ performance. Those with the highest rank are the most likely to move the injured worker to recovery more quickly and at the lowest cost.

Both predictive modeling and predictive analytics deal in probabilities regarding future behavior. Predictive modeling uses statistical methods, and predictive analytics looks at what was, is and, therefore, probably will be. For predictive analytics, it is important to identify relevant variables that can be found in the data and take action when those conditions or events occur in claims.

One way to find critical variables is to review industry research. For instance, research has shown that, when there is a gap between the date of injury and reporting or the first medical treatment, something is not right. That gap is an outlier in the data that predicts claim complexity.

Another way to identify key variables is to search the data to find the most costly cases and then look for consistent variables among them. Each book of business may have unique characteristics that can be identified in that manner.

Importantly, predictive analytics can be used concurrently throughout the course of the claim. The data is monitored electronically to continually search for outlier variables. When predictive outliers occur in the data, alerts can be sent to the appropriate person so that interventions are timely and more effective.

For example, to evaluate medical provider future performance, select data elements that describe past behavior. Look at past return-to-work patterns and indemnity costs associated with providers. If a provider has not typically returned injured workers to work in the past, chances are pretty good that behavior will continue.

For organizations looking to implement analytics, those who have already made the plunge suggest starting by taking stock of your organization’s current state. “The first thing you need to know is what is happening in your population,” says Rishi Sikka, M.D., senior vice president of clinical transformation for Advocate Health Care in Illinois. “Everyone wants to do all the sexy models and advanced analytics, but just understanding that current state, what is happening, is the first and the most important challenge.”

The accuracy and usability of results will depend greatly on the quality of the data analyzed. To get the best and most satisfying results from predictive analytics, cleanse the data by removing duplicate entries, data omissions and inaccuracies.

For powerful medical management informed by analytics, identify the variables that are most problematic for the organization and continually scan the data to find claims that contain them. Then send an alert. Structuring the outliers, monitoring the data to uncover claims containing them, alerting the right person and taking the right action is a powerful medical management strategy.

Fraud: When Mom Is Your Worst Enemy

Mother’s Day is a special time to celebrate all those kisses and hugs, the rides to the mall, the doctors’ appointments, the countless soccer-basketball-baseball games, a special note tucked into a pocket or care package sent to camp. But remember, sometimes it’s what a person doesn’t do that matters, and some moms are just bad to the bone.

More than 30% of identity theft cases involve a family member or close friend. The reason is simple: access. Whether it’s your mother, father, foster families, siblings, close friends or your spouse—access often is the only catalyst needed to turn your credit report into a crime scene. Here are a few examples from the Mommy Dearest files.

Betz Noir

Axton Betz-Hamilton discovered she was an identity theft victim when she rented her first apartment and was told that a deposit was required to turn on the electricity because she had bad credit. She thought she had no credit at all. Her credit report said otherwise. Her assumption at the time was that whoever stole her parents’ credit a while back had hit hers, as well. Then the truth came out.

Betz-Hamilton’s mom, Pamela Betz, died in 2013. Shortly after that, Betz-Hamilton says her father discovered a box that contained credit card statements in Axton’s name, so he called to razz her about her profligate spending. He then discovered he also had some crazy spending, and so did his father, who lived with them. They all allegedly were hit by Mama Betz.

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No Cheers for This Mom

Some mothers have a hard time giving their kids space to grow and become their own person. Others can be smothering to the point that children can’t do anything on their own, but Wendy Brown took it to another level when she used her daughter’s identity and showed up for cheerleader tryouts at Ashwaubenon High School in Wisconsin.

With her daughter living in another state with family, Brown, 33, decided it was time to get her high school diploma—and it seems, while she was at it, get another shot at the high school experience. She was caught by truancy officers and sentenced to three years in a psychiatric hospital.

G.I. Jane Deferred

Cassidy McKenna had just graduated from high school and was excited about enlisting in the armed forces. But when she signed up, they wouldn’t take her. While it’s generally known that bad credit can affect a soldier’s security clearance, the Armed Forces also will turn down prospective recruits with unpaid debts that are overdue or in collection, until the issues are resolved.

McKenna said she didn’t know that she had bad credit. She had always lived at home and had no credit cards. The damage was caused by an outstanding electric bill for $1,755 and another $1,123 owed to a cable provider. When she confronted her mother about the bills, she said her mom went AWOL, only turning up at the Kerr County Courthouse, where she was answering McKenna’s theft charges against her.

Apple of Her Eye?

Mom and alleged fraudster Kristina Anh Giusti, 44, of Garden Grove, CA, first attracted the attention of the Chino Hills Police Department after an investigation into $800 in fraudulent credit card charges at local retailers. Investigators say the evidence they collected points to Giusti’s making the charges.

According to CBS Los Angeles, police found “altered credit cards issued in the suspect’s name, six laptops, two tablets, an embossing machine and a tip card machine used for forging credit cards. … Detectives also found a card encoder, several boxes of white stock credit cards, a money counter” and $11,000 in cash. Police allege the woman had two accomplices … one of them her daughter.

‘In the Family Way’ Fraud

Hairdresser Jennifer Perik, from DuPage County outside of Chicago, is expecting both a baby and a criminal trial in the months to come. If the charges stick, she will join the ranks of identity-thief moms.

Perik is accused of making $6,000 in fraudulent charges on a Discover card that belonged to her hair client, a 94-year-old woman. Investigators say that more than half that amount went to a sperm bank with offices in Virginia and Maryland that boasts high-quality donors. At a bond reduction hearing, Assistant State’s Attorney Diane Michalak said that Perik was seven weeks pregnant, but that it was not known if the pregnancy was the result of in vitro fertilization.

We’re always talking about identity theft being the third certainty in life, yet the crime almost always takes victims by surprise—all the more if the perp is Mom. It’s always a good idea to take protective measures to reduce your risk, but even then it’s impossible to entirely prevent the crime from happening. You can, however, reduce the damage from fraud by detecting it as quickly as possible. Check your financial statements—ideally online, every day—for any fraudulent charges, and dispute anything you didn’t authorize. Request your credit reports, which you can get for free once a year, to look for new accounts that you don’t recognize. And your credit scores serve as your snapshot of your credit health—by tracking them over time, you can catch any big, unexpected changes that may be a sign of a big, unexpected problem. You can get your credit scores for free from many sources, including Credit.com.

This Mother’s Day, celebrate the women who have done so much for us—and thank your lucky stars that your mom isn’t a fraudster. Or is she? … Maybe wait until Monday to investigate.

This piece was written by Adam Levin. Levin is chairman and co-founder of Credit.com and Identity Theft 911. His experience as former director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs gives him unique insight into consumer privacy, legislation and financial advocacy. He is a nationally recognized expert on identity theft and credit.