Tag Archives: corelogic

IoT: Collaboration Is Now Mandatory

The definition of collaboration is the action of working with someone to produce or create something. That seems far too simplistic a way to describe the many types of collaboration already at work in the insurance industry and moreover does not begin to convey the looming and enormous demand for working together that will be required for success in implementing the Insurance Internet of Things (IoT).

Historically, the insurance industry has had to use a wide variety of collaboration tools to succeed as data, information, consumer behavior, products and regulations changed with increasing velocity. These tools included e-mail, texting, instant messaging, content management systems, enterprise social platforms and formal enterprise collaboration software. Insurers have even begun to leverage the use of digital technology and web-based collaboration tools such as Slack to empower employees, enhance user experiences, improve internal communication and strengthen agent and broker relationships.

See also: Insurance and the Internet of Things  

Looking beyond insurance companies themselves, we note the emergence of insurtech accelerators and incubators, both independent and captive. What is becoming apparent is that there is a convergence taking place between these entrepreneurial startups and the traditional carriers, sparking collaboration between the new, small and fast market entrants with the old, big and slow incumbents. Much more of this kind of collaboration will be required for the insurance industry to survive and thrive in tomorrow’s world.

New forms of collaboration are emerging in the insurance ecosystem, some more formal than others. Strategic alliances and partnerships are being announced daily, as are vendor-vendor and carrier-carrier arrangements. Recent examples are plentiful; CoreLogic joined the Guidewire PartnerConnect program to deliver more accurate property risk pricing and residential estimating more efficiently to Guidewire’s property insurance customer base, and Insurity collaborated with Allstate Business Insurance to quickly deliver a new self-service quoting app with convenient data pre-fill.

Co-opetition is a more innovative form of collaboration that has been gaining traction. Former competitors work together to leverage a common, defined opportunity that yields better results for each company than either could have achieved on its own. In the world of insurance IoT, of which the connected car is a major subset, we increasingly see original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) participating in programs with auto insurers with telematics data exchanges and with each other in developing vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication standards.

In other areas of insurance IoT, we are seeing a rapidly increasing number of health and property insurtech partnership announcements with insurers delivering innovative new risk-management products and services to consumers (e.g. Vitality-John Hancock, Roost-Liberty Mutual, True Motion-Progressive, etc.).

As the number of connected things expands exponentially, so, too, will the frequency and velocity of data generated by these sensors and devices. The ability to receive, normalize, manage and use all of this digital data will quickly exceed the capacity and expertise of even the largest insurers, so collaboration with a new generation of information management and data science providers will be mandatory.

See also: 12 Issues Inhibiting the Internet of Things  

For insurers and others to successfully navigate this burgeoning ecosystem, access to relevant knowledge and competitive information will also be mandatory, and one effective way to gain these insights is participation in subject-specific industry conferences where expert speakers and industry thought leaders share their experiences and insights. One such event is the Insurance IoT USA Summit taking place in Chicago on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1.

So critical will be effective collaboration in the future that it is conceivable that formal courses, certifications and degrees in collaboration will be offered by business schools in response to the exploding demand for this set of business skills and expertise driven by IoT proliferation and adoption. In any event, participants in the insurance ecosystem that best master the art of collaboration are sure to be the market leaders of the IoT future.

The Next Step in Underwriting

When a person applies for a mortgage in the U.S., credit reports are pulled from all three bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Why? Because a single bureau does not provide the whole story. When you’re lending hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars it makes sense to find out as much as you can about the people borrowing the money. The lender wants the whole story.

When you’re underwriting the property, doesn’t it make sense to get more than one perspective on its risk exposure? Everyone in the natural hazard risk exposure business collects different data, models that data differently, projects that data in different ways and scores the information uniquely. While most companies start with similar base data, how it gets treated from there varies greatly.

When it comes to hazard data there are also three primary providers, HazardHub, CoreLogic and Verisk. Each company has its team of hazard scientists and its own way of providing an answer to whatever risk underwriting and actuarial could be concerned with. While there are similarities in the answers provided, there are also enough differences — usually in properties with questionable risk exposure — that it makes sense to mitigate your risk by looking at multiple answers. Like the credit bureaus, each company provides a good picture of risk exposure, but, when you combine the data, you get as complete a picture as possible.

See also: Next Generation of Underwriting Is Here  

Looking at risk data is becoming more commonplace for insurers. However, if you are looking at a single source of data, it is much more difficult to use hazard risk data to limit your risk and provide competitive advantage. Advances in technology (including HazardHub’s incredibly robust APIs) make it easier than ever to incorporate multi-sourced hazard data into your manual and automated underwriting processes.

As an insurer, your risk is enormous. Using hazard data — especially multi-sourced hazard data — provides you with a significantly more robust risk picture than a single source.

At HazardHub, we believe in the power of hazard information and the benefits of multi-sourcing. Through the end of July, we’ll append our hazard data onto a file of your choice absolutely free, to let you see for yourself the value of adding HazardHub data to your underwriting efforts.

For more information, please contact us.

Analytics at the Next Level: Transformation Is in Sight

Although insurance companies are embracing analytics in many forms to a much higher degree than other businesses, adoption by the insurance industry is still only in its adolescent stage. Deployment is broad but inconsistent. The use of analytics may be about to mature considerably, though, based on a recent series of mergers and acquisitions.

Currently, while a majority of large carriers use predictive modeling in one of more lines of business, and mostly in personal lines auto, a smaller percentage use it in their commercial auto and property units. Insurers recognize predictive analytics as a critical tool for improving top-line growth and profitability while managing risk and improving operational efficiency. Insurers believe predictive analytics can create competitive advantage and increase market share.

Fueling even greater excitement – and soon to be driving transformational innovation – is the recent surge of M&A activity by both new and nontraditional players, which have combined risk management and sophisticated analytics expertise with robust and diverse industry database services. The list of recent deals includes:

  • CoreLogic’s 2014 purchase of catastrophe modeling firm Eqecat, following its 2013 acquisition of property data provider Marshall & Swift/Boeckh; a significant minority interest in Symbility, provider of cloud-based and smartphone/tablet-enabled property claims technology for the property and casualty insurance industry; and the credit and flood services units of DataQuick.
  • Statutory and public data provider SNL Insurance’s 2014 purchase of business intelligence and analytics firm iPartners, which serves P&C and life companies.
  • Verisk Analytics’ 2014 acquisition of EagleView Technology, a digital aerial property imaging and measurement solution.
  • LexisNexis Risk Solutions’ 2013 acquisition of Mapflow, a geographic risk assessment technology company with solutions that complement the data, advanced analytics, supercomputing platform and linking capabilities offered by LexisNexis.

Other 2013/2014 transactions that have broad implications for the insurance analytics and information technology ecosystem include:

  • Guidewire Software, a provider of core management system software and related products for property and casualty insurers, acquired Millbrook, a provider of data management and business intelligence and analytic solutions for P&C insurers.
  • IHS, a global leader in critical information and analytics, acquired automotive information database provider R.L. Polk, which owns the vehicle history report provider Carfax. 
  • FICO, a leading provider of analytics and decision management technology, acquired Infoglide Software, a provider of entity resolution and social network analysis solutions used primarily to improve fraud detection, security and compliance.
  • CCC Information Services, a database, software, analytics and solutions provider to the auto insurance claims and collision repair markets, acquired Auto Injury Solutions, a provider of auto injury medical review solutions. This transaction follows CCC’s acquisition of Injury Sciences, which provides insurance carriers with scientifically based analytic tools to help identify fraudulent and exaggerated injury claims associated with automobile accidents.
  • Mitchell International, a provider of technology, connectivity and information solutions to the P&C claims and collision repair industries, plans to acquire Fairpay Solutions, which provides workers’ compensation, liability and auto-cost-containment and payment-integrity services. Fairpay will expand Mitchell’s solution suite of bill review and out-of-network negotiation services and complements its acquisition of National Health Quest in 2012.

Based on these acquisitions and the other trends driving the use of analytics, it will be increasingly possible to:

  • Integrate cloud services, M2M, data mining and analytics to create the ultimate insurance enterprise platform.
  • Identify profitable customers, measure satisfaction and loyalty and drive cross/up-sell programs.
  • Capitalize on emerging technologies to improve pool optimization, create dynamic pricing models and reduce loss and claims payout.
  • Encourage “management by analytics” to overcome departmental or product-specific views of customers, update legacy systems and reduce operating spending over the enterprise.
  • Explore external data sources to better understand customer risk, pricing, attrition and opportunities for exploring emerging markets.                       

As the industry is beginning to understand, the breadth of proven analytics applications and the seemingly unlimited potential to identify even more, coupled with related M&A market activity that will drive transformational innovation, indicates that the growing interest in analytics will be well-rewarded. Those that are paying the most attention will become market leaders.

Stephen will be Chairing Analytics for Insurance USA, Chicago, March 19-20, 2014.

Is M&A in Data and Analytics Setting a Path for Innovation?

The trend of acquisitions of software and data providers is continuing, but with a twist that may lay the foundation for innovation in the insurance industry. 

CoreLogic closed out 2013 with a bang by announcing its acquisition of Eqecat, a catastrophe modeling firm, on Dec. 20, adding to an already impressive list of acquisitions in the past year. CoreLogic added three real estate companies from TPG Capital Decision Insight Information Group–Marshall & Swift/Boeckh, DataQuick Information Systems and DataQuick Lender Solutions (credit and flood-services units)–further extending into the insurance data and analytics space.  

On Jan. 13, 2014, SNL Insurance, which provides a range of statutory data for insurers that links with public data, announced the acquisition of iPartners LLC, a SaaS business intelligence and analytics solution for both the property and casualty and life and annuity insurance industries. SNL says the acquisition will provide its clients a robust BI and reporting tool for operational needs.  

And Verisk Analytics, a supplier of data to insurers and banks, announced on Jan. 14 the acquisition of EagleView Technology, a provider of property images for nearly 90% of all U.S. structures. The images, based on digital aerial image capture, are analyzed to provide information to estimate property size and proximity to risks to assist in underwriting and claims assessments.

While the initial reaction might be to think of these as just another series of acquisitions, these actually point to the great possibility for change in how we access and use data in the insurance industry, a real mash-up of ideas and technology. As an industry, we are intensely dependent on data. But the data we use is fragmented across multiple organizations, accessed and paid for based on 10- to 20-year-old business/pricing models, requires significant integration and is often ineffectively used because of a lack of analytic capabilities. But these acquisitions have the potential to change this landscape.

These acquisitions and others are positioning the industry to be ready to move beyond long-held traditional offerings into “pay-by-use models” for both software (SaaS) and data (DaaS). Each offers the deepening analytics capabilities and expertise that can be used to analyze and create data from all the source data acquired, offering new data points for insurance business processes. Together, these create the opportunity to completely change the business model for data providers. This will enable the provision of new pricing, ease of access and new data based on analysis for many insurers, particularly mid-sized to small insurers, that may not have the expertise, resources or technology to do this by themselves.  

As new models emerge, the implications and the opportunities will be substantial. There could be a new wave of innovation for insurance products, business processes, markets, competition and business models. The playing field could be leveled for access to traditional and new data and information for insurers of all sizes and even for new entrants to the industry.

Who will take the first step forward in creating and offering a new model? How quickly will the innovator bring value and potential to the industry? If the traditional providers don’t, then companies outside our industry who see the strategic importance of data, cloud and new models will. Does Google come to mind?