Tag Archives: controlled substances

Novel Controls on Physician Dispensing

As you know, I’m not a fan of physician dispensing. In limited cases, there can be benefits from patient compliance and convenience and from immediate treatment. However, my opinion is that in most cases physician dispensing creates a motivation to continue prescribing (because revenue to the physician is at stake) and causes patient safety issues (by bypassing the people who really understand drugs — pharmacists and pharmacies — and possibly not taking into account drug interactions).

On top of that, physician dispensing can increase lost time by an injured worker, as documented in a study of Illinois. When evaluating the differences between physician-dispensed and non-physician-dispensed medications, the study found:

  • For physician-dispensed, non-narcotic drugs — medical costs ▲ 39%, indemnity costs ▲ 27%, lost-time days34%, average total claim ▲ 31%, # of prescriptions = 2.99
  • For physician-dispensed narcotic drugs — medical costs ▲ 78%, indemnity costs ▲ 57%, lost-time days ▲ 85%, average total claim ▲ 64%, # of prescriptions = 3.20

Several states have tried to combat inappropriate physician-dispensing over the past few years, using fee schedule and rules and even felonies as countermeasures. Some efforts have been successful, while others have just created a continuing cat-and-mouse game for repackagers and physicians vs. payers.

Well, effective Jan. 1, 2016, Nevada instituted its own type of reform, specific to workers’ comp. The bill does not appear to be ambiguous or up for interpretation. The bill (SB 231) was signed by the governor on May 27, 2015, but the intended (and unintended) ripple effects started last Friday. Read the entire act here. To highlight:

  • Section 1.1.a – A “provider of healthcare” can only provide an initial 15-day supply of Schedule II or III controlled substances to an injured worker. Note that this excludes pharmacists and hospitals, both reasonable carve-outs. Any subsequent such controlled substances must be dispensed by a pharmacy. Excellent.
  • Section 1.1.b – The “provider of healthcare” dispenser must include the original manufacturer’s national drug code (NDC) on bills and reports. Good. This doesn’t necessarily fix the issue of repackagers becoming “manufacturers” of unique (previously unnecessary) dosages and inflating prices, but …
  • Section 1.1.c – A repackaged drug must not be used. Booyah.
  • Section 1.1.d – For outpatient care, a non-prescription drug will not be reimbursable. Excellent.

While not all dangerous or clinically inappropriate drugs are Schedule II or III, these new rules should certainly make a dent in direct dispensing of those that are. This bill does not outlaw physician dispensing, but it does remove revenue motivation so a “provider of healthcare” will focus on the most clinically appropriate care (which may not be a drug). Working as a team, the “provider of healthcare” and the pharmacist should determine what, if any, drugs are clinically appropriate for the injured worker/patient.

It will be interesting to see how the repackaging industry responds. For an example of the state of the industry in Nevada, check out this website. (Nine uses of the word “revenue” on the repackager’s home page. Hmmmm.)

If you operate in Nevada, keep your eyes and ears open. And if you see reactions, please let us all know!

The Worst Doctors From 2015

This list of worst doctors came to me via email, and I thought it was too good not to post. The origin of this is a Medscape article written by Lisa Pevtzow, Deborah Flapan, Fredy Perojo and Darbe Rotach. Please read the Medscape article in full. It’s a gem. The Medscape article shows pictures of these offenders.

Here is a summary of the worst doctors:

1) In July, Farid Fata, MD, was sentenced to 45 years in prison in Detroit for administering excessive or unnecessary chemotherapy to 543 patients. Some of them he deliberately misdiagnosed with cancer. In addition to enduring needless chemotherapy, the patients suffered anguish at the possibility of death. The massive criminal scheme netted at least $17 million from Medicare and private insurers.

2) Ophthalmologist David Ming Pon, MD, was found guilty in October of cheating Medicare by pretending to perform procedures on patients who did not need them. A federal jury convicted Dr. Pon on 20 counts of healthcare fraud. The scam netted Dr. Pon more than $7 million, according to the Department of Justice.

3) Joseph Mogan III, MD, was sentenced to about eight years in prison in March for operating two “pill mills” in suburban New Orleans. He gave out illegal prescriptions for narcotics and other controlled substances on a cash-and-carry basis. Dr. Mogan might have received a longer sentence had he not previously testified against a former New Orleans police officer who gave advice on how to operate under the radar of law enforcement. Prosecutors said the officer helped Dr. Mogan and his co-operator, Tiffany Miller, because Miller provided sexual favors and thousands of dollars in cash.

4) Dr. Aria Sabit pleaded guilty in a federal district court in Detroit in May to conspiring to receive kickbacks from a medical technology company. In 2010, Apex Medical Technologies, which distributes spinal surgery instruments, told the surgeon that, if he invested $5,000 in the company and used its hardware, he would share in the revenue. Ultimately, he received $439,000 from his investment. Dr. Sabit also pleaded guilty to stealing $11 million in insurance proceeds after billing Medicare, Medicaid and private insurers.

5) A Virginia jury awarded a patient $500,000 in June after an anesthesiologist made mocking and derogatory comments, which the patient accidentally recorded on a cellphone while he was sedated. The case inflamed the public after the Washington Post reported the story. The recording captured anesthesiologist Tiffany Ingham, MD, commenting on the patient’s penis and making fun of him. The surgical team also entered a fake diagnosis of hemorrhoids into his medical record.

6) A former researcher at Iowa State University was sentenced to 57 months in prison in July for systematically falsifying data to make an experimental HIV vaccine look effective. The researcher, Dong Pyou Han, PhD, was supposed to inject rabbits with a vaccine and test their sera for HIV antibodies. Dr. Han not only gave the head of the lab false test results about the vaccine, but he also injected the rabbits with human antibodies.

7) The Washington Medical Quality Assurance Commissions suspended the license of Arthur Zilberstein, MD, in June for sexting from the operating room. The commission said Dr. Zilberstein “compromised patient safety due to his preoccupation with sexual matters” during surgery. He was charged with exchanging sexually explicit texts during surgeries when he was the responsible anesthesiologist, improperly accessing medical-record imaging for sexual gratification and having sexual encounters in his office.

8) An Ohio cardiologist was convicted in September of billing Medicare and other insurers for $7.2 million in unnecessary tests and procedures. Dr. Harold Persaud put lives at risk by performing stent insertions, catheterizations, imaging tests and referrals for coronary artery bypass graft surgery that were not medically warranted, according to prosecutors.

Alas, such patient mistreatment and fraud is not that rare, as my readers.

The ‘CURES’ for Work Comp Claims

When an injured worker submits a claim, it initiates processes aimed at returning the injured worker to gainful and sustainable work at the earliest possible time. In this journey, checkpoints and milestones are the best means to monitor progress. Checkpoints generally relate to visits with a medical practitioner where medical conditions are checked against expectations and, if necessary, treatments are adjusted. Milestones are associated with reaching a goal.

At the first medical appointment, the physician is required to prepare a report for the claims administrator based on a comprehensive medical examination of the injured person, including a review of the medical history. At the same time, the physician can access CURES (Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System) to check whether the patient has received any scheduled controlled substances in the prior 12 months. Through this access, the physician can identify an at-risk patient and accordingly establish a treatment plan that considers both medications and adjunctive treatments. Also, if a patient is identified as an addict, he can be referred for rehabilitation and social re-integration. With subsequent medical appointments, the physician can again use CURES to check for any changes to the patient’s scheduled controlled substances usage since his last visit.

The importance of a physician using CURES to check a patient’s use of scheduled controlled substances cannot be overemphasized, especially in workers’ compensation, where a patient may not be forthcoming in sharing comorbidity information because of a lack of trust. Not knowing if a patient is currently taking scheduled controlled substances, the physician could jeopardize the patient by prescribing inappropriate medications.

In addition to the medical profession, CURES is available to Department of Justice investigators and law enforcement agencies to identify persons who visit a number of physicians to obtain supplies of scheduled controlled substances for abuse and diversion (i.e. physician shopping). Pharmacists and numerous regulatory boards from the medical board to the veterinary board also have access to CURES, providing them with the opportunity to monitor the medical profession for aberrant prescribing of scheduled controlled substances.

While states like Florida implemented a PDMP (prescription drug monitoring program) as late as 2011, California has monitored Schedule II controlled substances since 1940 and with the introduction of CURES in 1996 extended its monitoring to include Schedule III and IV controlled substances. Online access to CURES has also been available to the medical profession since 2009. Consequently, California has not experienced the abuse and diversion that Florida has with its “pill mills.”

Access to CURES by claims administrators or their representatives (i.e. third party payers) will not deliver improved quality of care or reduce prescription drug fraud and abuse and will add unnecessary costs through duplication of efforts already being performed by others using CURES. Close monitoring of checkpoints, however, by the claims administrator will provide benefits. Monitoring is accomplished through what is commonly referred to as “encounter data” and includes diagnoses, services performed and medications dispensed along with amounts charged and paid. Diagnoses, medical procedures and pharmaceuticals translated into coding systems such as ICD-10 (International Classification of Disease, 10th revision), HCPCS (HeathCare Common Procedure Coding System) and NDC (National Drug Code) provide excellent opportunities to automate the monitoring of encounter data.

Have claims administrators been able to implement technology solutions to automate the monitoring of encounter data and achieve outstanding results? Over the past two decades, many claims administrators have opted to outsource the management and control of critically important functions such as utilization review, medical bill review and pharmacy monitoring. Many of the outsource organizations only focus on that part of the encounter data that directly applies to their function — for example, pharmacy benefit managers only monitor the pharmacy. But using all the encounter data can promote a vibrant synergy very capable of achieving outstanding outcomes and results for the injured worker.

Losing control of encounter data eliminates the claims administrator’s ability to establish and monitor adherence to best evidence-based practices. When physicians have not adhered to their proposed treatment plans, opportunities to trigger yellow and red flags for investigation are lost.

Claims administrators who have automated the monitoring of their encounter data can assist states in reducing abuse and diversion by monitoring the quantities of medications being dispensed in a progressive or step therapy pain management plan, for example, and encouraging unused supplies to be returned to the physician at the next appointment. This can be achieved at no additional cost to the claims administrator and reduces the quantities of unused or unneeded prescription medications in circulation, which has been the focus of the DEA’s (U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency) “take back” initiatives. To date, the DEA has collected in excess of 1,400 tons of unused medications, which could otherwise have found their way into the illicit drug market.

For as long as the U.S. remains the biggest licit and illicit drug market in the world, claims administrators will remain challenged to deliver on their workers’ compensation claims handling obligations.

With a changing workforce, claims administrators will need to move more and more toward a biopsychosocial approach to managing medical conditions. They must provide quality care at the lowest possible cost, which can only be achieved through the fine analytics of consolidated encounter data.

Capturing encounter data through the claims administrator’s processes and fine analytics will consistently yield the best claims outcomes, from earlier return-to-work to lower costs associated with medical treatment through to automated overseeing of a claim, including provider performance monitoring and evaluation. All of these are the essence of superior workers’ compensation claims management.