Tag Archives: concussion

Wearable Tech Raises Privacy Concerns

Workers’ comp insurers are applauding wearable tech initiatives as a potential way to monitor and reduce workplace accidents and injuries. But some observers are asking at what cost to privacy.

AIG recently announced its strategic investment in tech startup Human Condition Safety (HCS). The start-up, a spin-out of Human Condition Labs, develops wearable technology that incorporates artificial intelligence, building information modeling and cloud computing to try to prevent workplace injuries. The company is targeting industries that hold the highest risk for workers, including heavy manufacturing, energy, warehousing and distribution, mining, transportation and construction.

Because state laws require businesses to provide medical coverage, rehabilitation services and lost wages to injured employees through workers’ compensation programs, coverage in this area is one of the insurance industry’s largest product lines. By decreasing employee injuries and deaths through wearables, the industry believes it may be able to lower costs and increase profits for itself and its clients. Employers have many incentives to test these products in their work environments.

But before concussion-detecting sensors in hard hats or fatigue-monitoring wristbands become widespread for workers, the tipping point may be that issue of privacy. Experts in workers’ comp say companies must first investigate employment legalities and may need to negotiate with labor unions.

As a result, insurance defense law firms that defend workers’ comp claims will want to pay close attention to emerging technology trends such as wearable tech and other similar innovations for the following reasons:

  • Any safety initiatives that may reduce the number and severity of claims will reduce the number of claims that need to be litigated.
  • There will be privacy implications for both employees and employers. When it comes to granting access to individuals’ behavior and health information, law firms need to familiarize themselves with the type and purpose of data being collected, as well as the protection of that data.
  • Insurance carriers will continue to evaluate how new technologies might eliminate claims and reduce claims costs.

Wearable tech is still in its infancy because employees need to be convinced that the information collected for the safety of the greater good is worth it. Pilot programs underway may take a year or more before they are actually put into practice in workers’ compensation insurance programs, but insurance defense law firms will want to demonstrate an understanding of these technology trends to better serve the needs of insurers and their insureds.

Read more news about the insurance defense market at www.insurancedefensemarketing.com.

Is Baseline Testing Worth It? (Part 3)

This is the conclusion to the series of articles on whether baseline testing is worth the effort. The first two articles dealt with baseline testing from an employer’s point of view and from an injured worker’s point of view. We believe that those case studies were compelling. This final article will examine the statistics and, we believe, prove that baseline testing is truly worth the effort.

The concept of baseline testing for soft-tissue injuries began for us when requirements for set asides were established to protect Medicare from future medical expenses for workers’ compensation and general liability claims. ln 2011, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) mandated that all workers’ compensation  and general liability claims be reported in electronic format. This change enables CMS to look back and identify if it has ever made any work comp-related payments on a patient. Section 111 of the Medicare, Medicaid and SCHIP Extension Act of 2007 establishes Medicare’s status as a secondary payer under 42 U.S.C. 5 1395y (b), and this creates a right to reimbursement for any future claims related to a past workers’ compensation settlement. Therefore, this act has the potential to impose a possible risk of future liability against all parties indefinitely.

Soft-tissue injuries are the leading cause of claims and costs in this challenging system. They account for at least one third of all claims and are the primary reason for lost time at work. So, we  began baseline testing for soft-tissue injuries for the transportation industry in October 2011. Since that time, we have expanded our baseline testing  program to other industries: manufacturing, retail, warehouse and construction. Our initial testing  was in Georgia and quickly expanded to Texas. Now, our program is being conducted in California, Arizona, Utah, Florida, Oklahoma, Colorado and Indiana. Since the inception of the program, we have conducted more than 15,000 baseline tests.

Of those we tested, 27 have attempted to file a workers’ compensation soft-tissue claim. Only five of those 27 were found to have a change in condition. ln other words, only five had a pathology that arose out of the course and scope of employment (AOECOE). No claim was accepted for the remaining 22 cases. Of the five claims that were accepted, all resolved with the appropriate treatment. Of the cases where there was no change in condition and the claim was not accepted, three went on to litigation. These cases are summarized in the following vignettes.

Litigated case 1: A 54-year-old truck driver underwent the post-loss electrodiagnostic functional assessment (EFA) to compare with the baseline. She alleged incapacitating pathology to her neck, shoulder and back. But the comparison between the post-loss test and the baseline actually demonstrated improvement. It was found she had 25 prior workers’ compensation claims related to the same body part. Her case ultimately went to arbitration. This complicated case settled for less than $6,000. There was a full release with language to prevent future medical care from CMS, thereby protecting the employer from the unpredictable expenses of future claims to the same body part.

Litigated Case 2: A truck driver who was employed for less than a month experienced an unwitnessed fall from a truck and alleged injuries to his back, plus cumulative trauma. When the comparison tests were done, it was revealed that he had substantial pathology on the baseline that was unchanged in the EFA post-loss test.The claim remained denied based on the EFA-STM program, but he continued to receive treatment. No payments were made for the patient’s care, and he continued to pursue the issue through the legal process. The employer agreed to an independent medical exam (IME) appointment to review the status of the EFA comparisons and help establish AOECOE. The IME doctor, based on the EFA reports, found no work-related injury, leading to an uncomplicated resolution of this case.

Litigated Case 3 was detailed in Part 1 of this series. In summary, the results of the EFA-STM program demonstrated no change in condition, and the findings were affirmed in court.

In these three case examples, no unnecessary medical care was permitted; paid time off work was shortened; and litigation was resolved earlier in the process, reducing costs. Even though people will sometimes still litigate, the baseline testing gave objective medical evidence for AOECOE conditions and supported the defense of the case.

A review of the history of claims in businesses also shows that utilization of EFA –STM program significantly reduces the frequency of workers’ compensation injury claims.

In summary, the EFA program leads to more accurate diagnoses and ultimately better site-specific care to the injured worker. There are far fewer litigated cases, and even these cases are less costly because the objective evidence leads to more rapid, accurate and favorable results.

ls baseline testing worth the effort? Indubitably, yes!

Workers' Compensation No Longer the Exclusive Remedy: RICO on the Radar, Part 2

Understandably, Part 1 of this article series has been met with some controversy and skepticism. The article is not designed to scare employers, as might have been suggested. Its intention is to educate employers about the many issues facing them when an employee becomes injured, that transcend the State Workers’ Compensation System and a workable solution to overcoming the challenges. Employers can no longer afford to bury their heads and rely on the exclusive remedy position. Yes, it may be here to stay, but it is becoming a bit frayed around the edges.

Coincidently, when Part 1 of this article was published, The National Football League (NFL) announced that it had reached a 765 million dollar settlement with players and their families for the settlement and consolidation of approximately 4,500 concussion claims. The players alleged that the NFL hid or ignored the facts that concussions caused brain injuries. Under the settlement, the NFL will pay 675 million dollars to retired players who demonstrate medical evidence of brain injury. Payouts of up to 5 million dollars each could go to players found to have Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases or other concussion-related conditions, or to their families. The settlement came just prior to the start of football season and will put an end to the mounting litigation that threatened the multi-billion dollar league.

United States District Presiding Judge Anita B. Brody appointed Judge Phillips to oversee the negotiations. Judge Philips said, “This is a historic agreement, one that will make sure that former NFL players who need and deserve compensation will receive it, and that will promote safety for players at all levels of football.”

 “This agreement lets us help those who need it most and continue our work to make the game safer for current and future players. Commissioner Goodell and every owner gave the legal team the same direction: do the right thing for the game and for the men who played it,” said NFL Executive Vice President Jeffrey Pash. “We thought it was critical to get more help to players and families who deserve it, rather than spend many years and millions of dollars on litigation. This is an important step that builds on the significant changes we’ve made in recent years to make the game safer, and we will continue our work to better the long-term health and well-being of NFL players.”

Once final documentation is completed, the settlement will be filed with Judge Brody, who will then schedule a hearing to consider whether or not to grant preliminary approval to the agreement. The retired players will then have the ability to file objections to the settlement.

One may ask what this has to do with Part 1 of this article.  An important component of this settlement is baseline testing. According to the settlement, baseline medical exams will be provided, the cost of which will be capped at $75 million. This will be a key element in ascertaining the conditions of current and retired players, gauging  the progression of any injuries they may have and having documentation of the medical status. This key component is the subject of Part 1 of this article. Baseline testing is not simply a self-promotion for the EFA-STM, but is a major part of helping injured workers, no matter what their occupations may be.

These cases are just the beginning, and it appears that the exclusive remedy provision for workers' compensation will no longer serve to prevent costly civil litigation as evidenced by the NFL settlement. An employer, insurance carrier/TPA and physician can take several steps to protect themselves. First, evidence-based medicine should always prevail. Objective medical evidence can help protect against claims for fraudulent denials of work-related injuries. Also, employers should accept only claims that arise out of the course and scope of employment (AOECOE). If an employer can objectively document AOECOE issues, fraudulent claims and fraudulent denials can be avoided and most importantly, correct treatment can be prevail.

A good approach to determining AOECOE claims is baseline testing, as it can identify injuries that arise out of the course and scope of employment. When a work-related claim is not AOECOE, as proved by objective medical evidence, such as pre and post assessments, then not only is there no workers’ compensation claim, there is no OSHA recordable claim, and no mandatory reporting issue. Conversely, if there is an injury, the injured worker can get the best site specific treatment and prevent inappropriate treatment and unnecessary progression of the underlying conditions.

The NFL recognized the importance of baseline testing with its recent settlement, and it is only the beginning. MSD for NFL players is also a significant problem. Why not baseline all football players, or, for that matter, all professional athletes, to address any injuries that may occur while playing and return them to the field sooner? This would promote better health and performance and might extend their careers. Professional athletes tend to play through their injuries, potentially causing more harm. An objective baseline test can assist all parties by providing objective medical evidence of an injury and outlining appropriate care. This truly is a win-win situation.

A proven example of a baseline test for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) cases is the EFA-STM program. EFA-STM program begins by providing baseline injury testing for existing employees and new hires. The data is interpreted only when and if there is a soft tissue claim.  After a claim, the injured worker is required to undergo the post-loss testing. The subsequent comparison objectively demonstrates whether or not an acute injury exists. If there is a change from the baseline, site specific treatment recommendations are made for the AOECOE condition, giving the doctors more information and helping to ensure the injured worker receives the best care possible.

The case of the NFL settlement may not be a RICO claim, but, certainly, it tries the boundaries of the exclusive remedy provision of workers compensation. Baseline tests like the EFA-STM are a proven way to providing better work-related care. It is time for change and to think outside of the box to provide the answers so that we can become proactive, not reactive.