Tag Archives: cloud storage

Use of Cloud Apps Creates Data Leakage

A large U.S. cable television company recently sought to better understand how its employees were using cloud apps to stay productive. Management had an inkling that workers routinely used about a dozen or more cloud file sharing and collaboration apps.

Ed note_CipherCloud_Willy Leichter

An assessment by CipherCloud showed the employees actually were using 204 cloud services that posed a security risk: 78 cloud storage apps and 126 collaboration apps, many of which included file-sharing functions.

Emerging risk: A major concern for the cable company was that sensitive information about customers and employees could leak unnoticed beyond its network perimeter.

Free cloud file storage makes it convenient to share data quickly and widely. The company learned that sensitive files had been moved into folders accessible to people who should not have had access to the information.

Wider implications: Like many organizations, the cable company routinely stores customer transactions data as well as employee healthcare data covered by HIPAA privacy rules. The rising use of free Web apps by employees has created many more opportunities for data leakage and could lead to sanctions and fines – or, worse, an embarrassing, expensive data breach.

The cable company set up sanctioned accounts with a popular cloud storage service-Box-for employees to use. It also has begun examining other steps it can take to impose tighter controls around sensitive company records.

Excerpts are from ThirdCertainty’s interview with Willy Leichter of CipherCloud. (Answers edited for length and clarity.)

3C: Can you outline how the rising use of cloud apps in the workplace is creating security issues?

Leichter: A typical process is one person sends you something from a Dropbox account, and suddenly you become a Dropbox user. Or, often, departments will say, “OK, we’re going to use Dropbox or Hightail for this particular project,” and it kind of grows department by department. It grows virally.

The challenge is the very nature of the whole file-sharing world. It’s like Swiss cheese. It’s designed to be very easy to share and to open up public links and to let another person in.

That’s where this cable company approached us. They had about a dozen different things they knew about and wanted to standardize.

3C: You found a lot more than a dozen cloud apps in use.

Leichter: We found well over 1,000 cloud apps, what we call shadow IT apps, that they were using. We have about 20 different categories of such apps; it could be software development tools, or it could be social tools. In one category, file-sharing tools, we found more than 120 apps. This one category is probably the most actionable category because file sharing involves sending people documents.

3C: How did this discovery help the cable company?

Leichter: They were trying to do two things. They were trying to standardize on two or three different file-sharing services and use monitoring tools on them. And they also wanted to shut down the worst offenders, which you can do easily enough.

3C: In general, what kinds of malicious or worrisome activity are you seeing in shadow IT?

Leichter: It’s kind of a spectrum. Officially sanctioned apps are being scanned in real time, using tools we and others make. That’s kind of a new world. We can give you all kinds of detail about who’s using all these apps. Then there’s the other 90% of the apps in shadow IT.

Anomalies can be where someone is sending huge amounts of files to some strange apps. Or someone is downloading stuff they shouldn’t be at two in the morning. Or it could be multiple people using the same account from different IP addresses. Someone is logging in from San Jose and then an hour later they’re logging in from Beijing. You can spot a lot of these and take steps to shut them down.

3C: What else surprised the cable company?

Leichter: One of the things they learned is why people were doing this. For the most part, it was because the company wouldn’t pay for them to use an account. So they were account hopping from one freebie to the next. It was because people just did not want to pay for stuff.

So now the company is trying to steer people to use better practices through outreach and education. And it also is buying them accounts.

A Technology Breakthrough for Valuing Tangible Assets

What are your clients’ tangible assets worth? If you are like most advisors, you don’t have a clear answer. Without that clarity, you are leaving yourself and your clients at risk. Tangible assets – valuables ranging from fine art and wine to classic cars and jewelry – make up an ever-increasing portion of household wealth. Yet there is little visibility into this asset class.

Why? Often, individuals find the process of documenting, tracking and managing the values of tangible assets to be tedious. Instead of producing a thorough inventory, the insured may opt for a blanket umbrella policy that covers general contents as a percentage of the home’s value. The individual may list certain items, but with inadequate documentation. Many times, both the insured and the insurer fail to keep up as the market value of collections changes.

Fortunately, technology has emerged that makes collecting and managing information about tangible assets significantly easier. Appraisers can collect detailed data and provenance on property and possessions and upload them to a personal, online digital locker, where the items are regularly valued, securely managed, and are accessible anytime. Individuals will soon be able to use their smartphones to take a picture of a valuable object and upload it directly to this locker. As items are added and values change, the owner is notified – and can choose to automatically alert his advisors, including insurers and wealth managers, to ensure the items are accounted for and adequately protected.

The continuous transparency that the locker provides into values can be eye-opening to users.  Case in point: A family in the Northeast has a large, valuable art collection. Thirty years ago, the family had the pieces insured, using estate values provided by auction houses. These values, as a rule, are much lower than retail replacement values, so the family’s collection was initially insured at about half of what it should have been. The collection had not been appraised since the early 1980s, and, when a wealth manager had it re-appraised in 2012, values had changed so substantially that a piece initially valued at several hundred thousand dollars now carries a fair market value of more than $50 million.

The consequences of this type of undervaluation are significant. Had the owner passed away before the revaluation, the estate could have suffered an immense tax bill. In the event of loss, theft, fire or water damage, the owner would have been severely underinsured and faced significant loss. In addition, had the owners known the higher value of the artwork, they could have sold or leveraged it.

The bottom line is: With more information about their valuables, individuals  – and their advisors – can make more informed decisions.

This ability to capture, securely store and provide real-time valuations is a momentous step forward in tangible wealth management, and has been made possible by several technological advancements:

1. Data About Prized Possessions
There is a massive amount of data now available on luxury items. Whether a person’s passion investment is wine, diamonds, classic automobiles or fine art, there is a database that captures the real-time value changes in the category. By using technology to process that data, individuals gain a better composite view of their wealth, a greater idea of potential liquidity options, and a more accurate way to assess risk.

2. Digital Collection — Onsite and at Retail
In the not-so-distant past, a person had to take pictures or videos and store them on a hard drive, keep receipts in a safe deposit box, and use a spreadsheet to capture information on valuables. Now that all communication and record keeping has gone digital, certified appraisers can use apps to capture all of this information on-site. Merchants can email electronic receipts. Individuals can snap a picture of any acquired item, add support information like a receipt, package art, or bar or QR-code and send it to their personal digital locker in real time. All of this information is securely accessible anytime, anywhere.

3. Cloud Storage and Connectivity
Once information is collected electronically, it can be safely and securely stored in a personal digital locker in the cloud. This eliminates the need for paper records or other media that can be lost, stolen, or destroyed.  In addition to storage, the cloud provides connectivity, creating a virtual ecosystem where individuals can privately view the value of their tangible assets and manage those assets. This new capability includes easy connections to on-line auction houses, dealers, insurers, wealth manager and the like to sell, insure, donate, or take other beneficial actions powered by information about everything a person owns.

Ultimately, data is currency, and new technology is helping individuals cash in on the data about their tangible wealth. The information about possessions has inherent value. By adopting emerging technologies to collect, value and connect the information about individuals’ personal property, individuals and their advisors can finally gain transparency into tangible assets – completing the total wealth picture.