Tag Archives: client

How to Choose a Great Coach

The Institute of Leadership & Management (ILM) published a report titled “Coaching for Success: The key ingredients for coaching delivery and coach recruitment.” There’s plenty of interesting snippets of research findings and practical advice.

If you have time, it is well worth a read, but the points that caught my eye were a three-stage process for coach selection. I agree with the ILM that the selection of coaches often still lacks a robust structured process and so am going to share their recommended process as a good example.

This process can be used by individuals for themselves or by someone selecting on behalf of an organization. It assumes that a long list of possible coaches has already been found. To achieve that, you could go as Wild West as a general Google search on “coach”/”leadership coach”/”executive coach.” However, I’d recommend starting with a pre-qualified list like the Association for Coaching (AfC) directory of coaches or equivalents from other coaching bodies.

Here are the stages that the ILM recommends, to be used like a checklist of questions to ask (I’ve added what I’d say if asked):

Stage 1: Long-list to Short-list

  • What experience of coaching does the coach have? (I could evidence my number of coaching hours and cite previous mentoring experience within a large corporation)
  • Can the coach demonstrate an understanding of the leadership challenges in your industry? (I’ve found some clients value my experience in customer insight leadership or within the insurance industry)
  • What training do they have? (I could evidence my ILM Level 7 qualification in Executive Coaching and Mentoring)
  • What ethical standards do they work to? (I share with clients a copy of the AfC code of ethics and explain that I abide by that)
  • What supervision does the coach have in place? (I use AfC/University of South Wales co-coaching forums)

Stage 2: Getting down to the last few

  • What coaching methodologies does the coach use, when and why? (my primary tools are active listening, Socratic questioning, goal-oriented models and, where relevant, positive psychology tools like Strength Finders)
  • What price do they charge? (average fees can vary around the country, but between £100-250 per hour is typical; I normally charge £150 per hour)

Stage 3: Final selection

  • What does the coach he can achieve for the individual coachee/client? (this is where a free introductory meeting can help me clarify where I may be able to help or if another intervention other than coaching might help more)
  • What do they believe they can achieve for the organization? (it’s always worth doing your homework on an organization and discussing context with a client, before you can offer a view on this)
  • Will the coach and the coachee/client get on? (at the end of the day, a lot comes down to personal chemistry, so I will meet up for a chat over a coffee and let us both assess if we feel it can work)

I hope you find that helpful, especially if you are facing this challenge. The ILM also suggests that competency frameworks from leading global coaching bodies can help, but I like the clear simplicity of the above list.

Has anyone found another approach to selecting a coach worked for them? Please share your experience.

How Safe Is Your Data — Really?

The number and the potential severity of cyber breaches is increasing. A recent PwC survey found that nearly 90% of large organizations suffered a cyber security breach in 2015, up from 81% in 2014. And the average cost of these breaches more than doubled year-on-year. With more connected devices than ever before—and a total expected to reach 50 billion by 2020 —there are more potential targets for attackers, and there is more potential for accidental breaches.

What’s more, as of late 2015, companies are, for the first time, listing their information assets as nearly as valuable as their physical assets, according to the 2015 Ponemon Global Cyber Impact Report survey, sponsored by Aon.

So, how do you keep your organization’s data—and that of your clients and customers—safe?

It’s not just a matter of investing in better technology and more robust systems, according to Aon cyber insurance expert Stephanie Snyder Tomlinson, who says, “A lot of companies find that the weakest link is their employees. You need to train employees to make sure that if they get a phishing email, they’re not going to click on the link; that they don’t have a Post-It note right next to their monitor with all of their passwords on it. It’s the human error factor that companies really need to take a good hard look at.”

From intern to CEO: Simple steps everyone can take

It’s easy for individuals to become complacent about data security, says Aon’s global chief privacy officer, Brad Bryant. But, with cyber threats increasing, it’s more important than ever to be aware of seemingly innocent individual actions that can potentially lead to serious cost and reputational consequences for your organization.

According to Bryant, there are four key things that everyone can do to help protect themselves and their organizations from the rising cyber threat:

  • Be alert to impersonators. Hackers are becoming increasingly sophisticated at tricking people into giving away sensitive information, from phishing to social engineering fraud. You need to be more vigilant than ever when transmitting information. Are you certain they are who they say they are?
  • Don’t overshare. If you give out details about your personal life, hackers may be able to use them to build a profile to access your or your company’s information. From birthdays to addresses, small details build up.
  • Safely dispose of personal information. A surprising amount of information can be retained by devices, even after wiping hard drives or performing factory resets. To be certain that your information is destroyed, you may need to seek expert advice or device-specific instructions.
  • Encrypt your data. Keeping your software up to date and password-protecting your devices may not be enough to stop hackers, should your devices fall into the wrong hands. The more security, the better, and, with the growing threat, encryption should be regarded as essential.

Key approaches for organizations to better protect data

To protect your, your customers’ and your and clients’ information, investing in better cyber security is one element. But data breaches don’t just happen through hacks, or even employee errors. At least 35% of cyber breaches happen because of system or business process failures, so it’s vital to get the basics right.

Prevention is key, says Tom Fitzgerald, CEO of Aon Risk Solutions’ U.S. retail operations. There are four key strategies he recommends all organizations pursue to limit the risk and make sure they’re getting the basics right:

  • Build awareness. Educate employees on what social engineering fraud is, especially those in your financial department. Remind employees to be careful about what they post on social media and to be discreet at all times with respect to business-related information.
  • Be cautious. Always verify the authenticity of requests for changes in money-related instructions, and double-check with the client or customer. Do not click on random hyperlinks without confirming their origin and destination.
  • Be organized. Develop a list of pre-approved vendors and ensure employees are aware. Review and customize crime insurance—when it comes to coverage or denial, the devil is in the details.
  • Develop a system. Institute a password procedure to verify the authenticity of any wire transfer requests, and always verify the validity of an incoming email or phone call from a purported senior officer. Consider sending sample phishing emails to employees to test their awareness and measure improvements over time.

Much of this advice is not new, but the scale of the threat is increasing, making following this advice more important than ever. Fitzgerald warns, “Social engineering fraud is one of the greatest security threats companies can encounter today. … This is when hackers trick an employee into breaking an organization’s normal digital and physical security procedures to access money or sensitive information. It can take many forms, from phishing for passwords with deceptive emails or websites, to impersonating an IT engineer, to baiting with a USB drive.”

How governments are driving data protection

The potential consequences of inadequate data security are becoming more serious, and courts and regulators are focusing on this issue globally.

The European Union is considering a Data Protection Directive to replace previous regulations implemented in 1995. The expected result will be a measure that focuses on the protection of customers data. Similarly, an October 2015 ruling by the European Court of Justice highlighted the transfer of customer data between the E.U. and U.S.

Bryant warns: “Regardless of where a company is located, the provision of services to E.U. customers and the collection or mere receipt of personal data from European citizens may potentially subject companies to E.U. jurisdiction. … Failure to comply could present unprecedented risk for companies, including fines of up to 4% of a company’s total global income.”

Changing E.U. rules aren’t the only thing that could affect your business. Internet jurisdictions and organizational operations are increasingly becoming cross-border. This global patchwork of Internet rules and regulations is why only 24% of cyber and enterprise risk professionals are fully aware of the possible consequences of a data breach or security exploit in countries outside their home base of operations.

Why getting the basics right is critical

As the Internet of Things continues to grow, the number and range of potential targets for cyber attack is only going to increase. While eliminating all cyber risk may be impossible, getting the basics right is becoming more important than ever.

Bryant says, “Given the large scope and impact of the various changes in data protection law—coupled with the drastic increase in fines—becoming educated on how to protect our data is more business-critical now than ever before.”

Gallup

A Wake-Up Call for B2B Brands

Gallup has just released the Guide to Customer Centricity: Analytics and Advice for B2B Leaders. The study reports that 71% of B2B clients are ready and willing to take their business elsewhere – not even one-third are fully engaged in their relationships with suppliers.

If you are operating in the B2B world – and you likely are, as either a supplier or client – do you find this statistic surprising?

This finding should be a wake-up call for B2B brands to figure out what is going on with their clients.

Do you know anyone in the business world who will say they are opposed to client-centricity? Putting clients at the center of a business remains an aspiration for many companies. Why is a strategy of such potential value so difficult to execute? What must happen to create mutually beneficial relationships between businesses and clients?

Companies have to get out of their own way and provide the value that clients expect. B2B or B2C, people handing over their money to you because they believe you are meeting their needs demand personalized engagement. They will choose the right moment to go elsewhere if you fail to deliver. Here are some areas that can make a difference:

  • Sales force compensation systems rewarding new client deals, with little incentive past contract signing and getting the client set up, can be updated to reward surfacing and delivering on continuing needs.
  • A linear approach to winning, welcoming and engaging clients can be reinvented to treat clients like people and break old habits of putting them through a gauntlet of internal systems and silos.
  • An outside/in understanding of client needs and wants can replace product pushing. Even traditional client needs assessments may not capture evolving needs – these methods tend to play back answers biased by the products driving today’s P&L.

There is no magic to this. Client-centricity requires change and a new mindset. It’s hard work. Where can you begin? Follow these four action steps to identify the priorities for your business:

  • Go out and talk to clients. The value of conversations where clients do most of the talking and you do most of the listening can be far higher than quantitative research.
  • Segment your client base. This is not just about bucketing clients by size, sector, potential value to you or historical purchase relationship. It’s about the clients’ journeys, including their attitudes and behavior, how they go about achieving their vision of success, and where you fit in.
  • Reimagine your clients’ experience of doing business with you. How does your brand enhance the clients’ journey — it’s not about making them fit in to your mechanisms for running your business. It’s about reflecting their preferences back to them in every interaction they have with you.
  • Figure out what this means for your employee experience and expectations. Everything from sales incentives, to marketing communications, to servicing policies to channel capabilities – should contribute to the experience your brand will create so your clients see you as enabling their vision for their business. Hire people who are not only business-focused but people-focused.

The very term “B2B” fails to acknowledge the reality that every brand, irrespective of whether its audience includes individuals or enterprises, must prove itself to the people who will be its users, buyers or payers. Behind every B2B relationship are P2Ps – People-to-People.

This post also appears in Amy’s regular column on Huffington Post.

How to Use All the New Data

Most people who purchase an insurance policy are faced with the daunting task of filling out an extensive application. The insurance company – either directly or through an intermediary – asks a myriad of questions about the “risk” for which insurance is being sought. The data requested includes information about the entity seeking to purchase insurance, the nature of the risk, prior loss experience and the amount of coverage requested. Insurers may supplement that information with a limited amount of external data such as motor vehicle records and credit scores. The majority of information used to inform the valuation process, however, has been provided by the applicant. This approach is much like turning off your satellite and data-driven GPS navigation system to ask a local for directions.

According to the EMC Digital Universe with research and analysis by IDC in 2014, the digital universe is “doubling in size every two years, and by 2020 the digital universe – the data we create and copy annually – will reach 44 zettabytes.” That explosion in the information ecosystem expands the data potentially available to insurers and the value they can provide to their clients. But it requires new analytical tools and approaches to unlock the value. The resulting benefits can be grouped generally into two categories:

  • Providing Risk Insights: Mining a wider variety of data sources yields valuable risk insights more quickly
  • Improving Customer Experience: Improving the origination policy service and claims processes through technology enhances client satisfaction

For each of these areas, I’ll highlight a vision for a better client value proposition, identify some of the foundational work that is used to deliver that value and flesh out some of the tools needed to realize this potential.

Risk Insights
Insurance professionals have expertise that gives them insight into the core drivers of risk. From there, they have the opportunity to identify existing data that will help them understand the evolving risk landscape or identify data that could be captured with today’s technology. One can see the potential value of coupling an insurer’s own data with that from various currently available sources:

  • Research findings from universities are almost universally available digitally, and these can provide deep insights into risk.
  • Publicly available data on marine vessel position can be used to provide valuable insights to shippers regarding potentially hazardous routes and ports, from both a hull and cargo perspective.
  • Satellite imagery can be used to assess everything from damage after a storm to proximity of other structures to the ground water levels, providing a wealth of insights into risk.

The list of potential sources is impressive, limited in some sense only by our imagination.

When using the broad digital landscape to understand risk — say, exposure to a potentially harmful chemical — we know that two important aspects to consider are scientific evidence and the legal landscape. Historically, insurers would have relied on expert judgment to assess these risks, but in a world where court proceedings and academic literature are both digitized, we can do better, using analytical approaches that move beyond those generally employed.

Praedicat is a company doing pioneering work in this field that is deriving deep insights by systematically and electronically evaluating evidence from various sources. According to the CEO Dr. Robert Reville, “Our success did not come solely from our ability to mine data bases and create meta data, which many companies today can do. While that work was complex, given the myriad of text-based data sources, others could have done that work. What we do that is unique is overlay an underlying model of the evolution of science, the legal process and the dynamics of litigation that we created from the domain expertise of our experts to provide context that allows us to create useful information from that data built to convert the metadata into quantitative risk metrics ready to guide decisions.”

The key point is that if the insurance industry wants to generate insights of value to clients, identifying or creating valuable data sources is necessary, but making sense of it all requires a mental model to provide relevance to the data. The work of Praedicat, and others like it, should not stop on the underwriter’s desktop. One underexploited value of the insurance industry is to provide insights into risk that gives clients the ability to fundamentally change their own destiny. Accordingly, advances in analytics enable a deeper value proposition for those insurers willing to take the leap.

Customer Experience
Requiring clients to provide copious amounts of application data in this information age is unnecessary and burdensome. I contrast the experience of many insurance purchasers with my own experience as a credit card customer. I, like thousands of other consumers, routinely receive “preapproved” offers in the mail from credit card companies soliciting my business. However appealing it may be to interpret this phenomenon as a benevolent gesture of trust, I know I have found myself on the receiving end of a lending process whereby banks efficiently employ available data ecosystems to gather insights that allow the assessment of risk without ever needing to ask me a single question before extending an offer. I contrast this with my experience as an insurance purchaser, where I fill out lengthy applications, providing information that could be gained from readily available government data, satellite imagery or a litany of other sources.

Imagine a time when much of the insurance buying process is inverted, beginning with an offer for coverage, rather than a lengthy application and quote request. In that future, an insurer provides both an assessment of the risks faced, mitigations that could be undertaken (and the savings associated), along with the price it would charge.

While no doubt more client-friendly, is such a structure possible? As Louis Bode, former senior enterprise architect and solution architect manager at Great American Insurance group and current CSO of a new startup in stealth-mode observes, “The insurance industry will be challenged to assimilate and digest the fire hose of big data needed to achieve ease of use and more powerful data analytics.”

According to Bode, “Two elements that will be most important for us as an industry will be to 1) ensure our data is good through a process of dynamic data scoring; and 2) utilize algorithmic risk determination to break down the large amounts of data into meaningful granular risk indexes.” Bode predicts “a future where insurers will be able to underwrite policies more easily, more quickly and with less human touch than ever imagined.”

The potential to use a broader array of data sources to improve customer experience extends well beyond the origination process. Imagine crowdsourcing in real time the analysis of images to an area affected by a natural disaster, getting real time insights into where to send adjusters before a claim is submitted. Tomnod is already crowdsourcing the kinds of analysis that would make this possible. Or imagine being able to settle an automobile claim by simply snapping a picture and getting an estimate in real time. Tractable is already enabling that enhanced level of customer experience.

The future for insurance clients is bright. Data and analytics will enable insurers to deliver more value to clients, not for additional fees, but as a fundamental part of the value they provide. Clients can, and should, demand more from their insurance experience. Current players will deliver or be replaced by those who can.

I’d like to finish with a brief, three-question poll to see how well readers think the industry is performing in its delivery of value through data and analytics to clients. Here is my google forms survey.