Tag Archives: civil unrest

Managing Challenges of Civil Unrest

Over the last year, many communities have faced large riots and protests that destroyed public and private property and resulted in hundreds of injuries. While these events carry a certain amount of unpredictability, an organization’s planning and response to these events can minimize losses and, most importantly, keep people safe. 

The latest Out Front Ideas with Kimberly and Mark webinar included a panel discussing the risk management challenges associated with civil unrest. Our guests were:

  • Anas Al-Hamwi – senior director, occupational health and injury management, Walgreens
  • Renata Elias – senior vice president, consulting solutions, Marsh
  • Barry Scott – deputy director of finance, risk manager, city of Philadelphia
  • Thomas Simoncic – president, Property Americas, Sedgwick

Protect, Prepare and Partner

No response is effective without proper planning and preparedness measures. Employers should consider their situational readiness by identifying tools that exist within their infrastructure, particularly their partnerships. Engaging industry peers, local community leaders and municipalities creates a network of advisers to assist with early communications to all stakeholders. If there are multiple operations locations, empower your leaders at each site to make the right decisions by giving them the tools they need to execute proper procedures. 

In planning, public entities need to adapt to allow and protect First Amendment activities while also ensuring lives are protected. While the balance can be tricky, partnering with federal, state and local governments can forecast any potential issues. First responders and police units need to be in constant communication to respond to any event rapidly. Including everyone from fire units to public transit employees ensures a collaborative effort. Keeping communities informed with timely messages keeps both the public and employees safe.

Having a crisis management capability within your organization helps senior leadership respond both quickly and appropriately. Formalize your crisis management plan with reporting incidents, escalation to senior leadership, defining the criteria for an escalation, incident screening and notification and activation of the senior leadership. Once you have buy-in and collaboration, you can align and integrate with all stakeholders to ensure the process is trained and exercised for capabilities.

Property Loss 

While civil unrest is not a natural disaster, like hurricanes, these events carry similar characteristics in that they are widespread, occur over different dates and cause varying levels of damage and business interruption. Understanding what your policy covers and does not cover is critical to preparation. Reach out to your partners within your carrier and broker relationships to fully assess your needs. Understanding the definition of occurrence in a policy can determine whether multiple days of civil unrest are considered one deductible. Establishing a timeline is necessary so your partners can scale and meet your needs while finding escalation and remediation points.

While protecting property is critical to restoring business activity, protecting people and their livelihood should always be a priority. Does your business continuity plan include details directing employees where to go if a specific location cannot operate? Will your vendors or suppliers know where to make deliveries? Where will your critical processes take place? All of these items should be addressed to ensure all stakeholders are prepared for a crisis. Mobilization with partners and vendors before an occurrence can affect response time, enabling an organization to get back to business faster.

See also: Did You Use the COVID Down Time?

Prioritize Your People

As you strategize for potential events and develop a continuity plan, people should be your priority. In keeping your employees and the community safe, communication and preparedness are key. Internal communications should be aligned with your strategies to ensure a coordinated response, and making appropriate connections with media partners can assist with disseminating external communications to the community. 

Civil unrest training, developed specifically for regions, can help employers establish preparedness measures for their workers. It forms a basic knowledge of staying safe in a crisis while also keeping people informed of the business continuity plan. Communicate with federal agencies and local municipalities to make sure your protocols meet their standards. Make sure your workers have resources like an employee assistance program to address their mental health throughout a crisis. Property can always be replaced, but human lives cannot, so people should always be the starting point when developing your plan.

Lessons Learned

The last year has served as a lesson in crisis for many organizations, especially those experiencing the aftermath of civil unrest for the first time. Responding to the next event requires careful consideration of what was missing in your initial response. Perform internal debriefs and post-incident reviews to highlight any gaps and bridge the silos. And when determining risks, consider all the external factors currently, like labor shortages, logistical supply chain and inventory issues and rising inflation. These can all add to the costs associated with property repairs. Lastly, this past year has taught us that truly anything can happen, so go forward humbly and be prepared for what you do not expect.

2016 Latin America Insurance Outlook

Despite sluggish economic growth and troubling inflation in key markets, the 2016 insurance market outlook for Latin America remains relatively bright. The rollout of new insurance products and distribution approaches at a time of low market penetration should drive strong growth for insurers. Insurance premium growth is expected to rise by around 6% to 7% in 2016 and possibly beyond should the economic environment improve as expected. At the same time, the emergence of end-to-end digital capabilities is transforming the Latin American insurance market. This digital market disruption will force insurers to make rapid revisions to existing business models to stay competitive and build market share.

Customer expectations rising

Commercial customers will continue to require more sophisticated insurance solutions in 2016, including coverage for business interruption, cyber security, civil unrest and errors and omissions. Latin American consumers, many of whom are young, cosmopolitan and tech-savvy, will continue to push for new insurance channels and services that fit their lifestyle. To respond, insurers will need to simplify and adapt products for Millennials and sharpen their focus on mobile and social media interactions. Evolving customer needs throughout the region are compelling insurance companies to rethink their strategies, processes and services. The rise of financial technology, or fintech, companies is causing insurers, particularly in the consumer insurance sector, to reconsider their business models and increase their investment in new digital technologies. Despite a desire to avoid conflicts with legacy models, insurers realize that flexibility, efficiency and innovation are critical for success in a more demanding marketplace

Competition heating up

The liberalization of industry regulation across Latin America has opened insurance markets to wider competition. The abundance of insurance capital has intensified competition from various directions: from global insurers seeking a foothold in the region to local insurers looking to expand cross country to entrenched insurers defending their turf. These competitive trends are keeping insurance rates flat through much of the region and, in some cases, pushing them lower. The most substantial rate decreases have been in non-catastrophe property.

Pockets of premium increases can be found in areas of instability, such as Venezuela. However, insurance capacity is very limited for Venezuelan political risk, with most risks dependent on the international reinsurance market.

As markets develop in Latin America, commercial demand is increasing for new forms of insurance coverage, such as environmental liability. The opening of the oil industry to the private sector in Mexico, for example, is exposing new oil exploration and production entrants to potential losses from environmental damages. But market capacity is still restrained in key markets, such as Brazil, where only a few insurers offer such liability coverage.

Read our Market Outlook for LATAM Insurance in 2016 to understand more about the dynamics facing the South America Market here.

Top 10 Emerging Social Risks in 2015

Risk managers make many decisions – building valuation, vendor management, employment issues, budget allocation, to list a few. However, in our rapidly changing society, managing risk is more than simply choosing the best insurance package or retention level. We must monitor our world to watch for emerging societal risks that can abruptly increase our day-to-day challenges.

What is an emerging risk? I’m going to borrow a definition from Donald Donaldson of LA Group in Montgomery, Texas. He defines emerging risk as: “A new loss exposure for which a risk treatment has not been identified, or an existing exposure that is evolving and becomes difficult to quantify.” The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) describes “emerging constructs” as “major trends or new and persistent threads of behavior driven by a particular alignment in incentives or a technological innovation.” Whether you define societal risks as emerging risks or constructs, many challenges lie ahead for today’s risk managers.

Using my education, which includes a master’s degree in sociology, and my experience as a risk management professional, I forecast 10 social risks emerging — in some cases swiftly — in 2015 and beyond.

1. Europe, Asia and North America face increased risk of “sleeper cell” terrorist attacks. As attacks increase, so will hate crimes against all Muslims. In response to such attacks, formerly moderate Muslims may become increasingly radicalized. Houses of worship will become much more difficult to insure as hate crimes increase.

2. U.S. police forces will face pressure. They will come under increased scrutiny by the public because of societal tensions, social media and a general distrust of authority. The use of body cameras and ramped-up training will increase, in part to satisfy the demands of insurers, which bear the brunt of adverse claims actions.

Increased terrorism may cause police departments to devote more resources to tracking down and isolating suspects. This may, for a time, tip the scales in favor of police forces. However, an increased focus on terror training leaves police with fewer resources to investigate property and day-to-day crime that we now rely on them to handle expeditiously. Losses will increase and further erode the public’s confidence in the police. The belief that the police are here to protect only the rich and powerful may spread, adding to the public’s growing distrust of authority.

Homeowners’ carriers may find themselves facing unusual risks as more homeowners arm themselves or buy personal protection dogs. Zdenek Blabla, owner of Alpine K-9, imports Czech Border Patrol protection dogs for his clients. “In the past year, I’ve sold several German shepherd dogs to special forces combat officers who don’t want to leave their families without protection during their activation,” he says. “They understand probably better than anyone the dangers we face in today’s society.”

3. Policing agencies across the nation will face increased recruitment and retention difficulties because of a less robust candidate pool and the need for officers who are better-qualified to interact with diverse communities. For years, U.S. police chiefs complained of their inability to attract highly qualified recruits. According to one textbook on policing tactics, “Poor recruitment and selection procedures result in hiring or promoting personnel who cannot or will not communicate effectively with diverse populations, exercise discretion properly or perform the multitude of functions required of the police.” It is clear that today’s U.S. police forces face significant and growing challenges.

4. Schools will focus more on instructing schoolchildren how to protect themselves in risky situations. Examples include how to cooperate with the police in a routine traffic stop or other police intervention, what to do in a hostage situation and “duck and cover” exercises for students in newly emerging earthquake zones. This increased focus on situational awareness will drain resources from already depleted public school funding, ultimately reducing the time spent for the actual education of students.

5. Corporations that rely heavily on suppliers both here and abroad will closely analyze their supply chain risk. With political disruptions likely to increase supply line disruptions, risk managers must analyze sole-source and global suppliers and ensure the organization’s insurance will respond appropriately to these unique risks. As recently as 2014, one major university referred to supply chain disruption from civil unrest as “not a major concern.” Given the recent disturbances in Oakland, CA, New York City and Ferguson, MO, civil unrest is a growing concern for risk managers worldwide in 2015.

6. Employers will realize the need to increase security while also purchasing kidnap and ransom coverage for employees who travel abroad or face domestic terrorism threats. The Charlie Hebdo massacre starkly revealed that Stéphane Charbonnier’s bodyguard was completely unprepared for that brutal attack. Business owners will face the need for improved security measures at their homes and businesses, as well as when their family members travel.

7. Communities will experience an increase in social unrest, driven by social media “flash mob” actions or spontaneous reactions after incidents with racial or equality overtones. Other controversial issues, such as environmental measures and other governmental actions, will trigger increased public discord and civil disruption.

8. Continued weather swings will result in property damage and loss of life from natural disasters. With more money allocated to fight the new wave of terrorism both at home and abroad, fewer federal dollars will be available to help weather-ravaged communities. As we saw after Hurricane Katrina, civil unrest follows when authorities cannot provide adequate protection.

9. Poverty, income disparity, unemployment and dissatisfaction among today’s youth will increase globally. Expect corporate leaders, including top insurers, to more candidly discuss poverty and income disparity, unemployment and dissatisfaction among today’s youth in America, the Middle East and Europe. Graham E. Fuller, author of The Future of Political Islam, discussed this concept in 2003: “The great question for most Middle Eastern societies is who will be able to politically mobilize this youth cohort most successfully: the state, or other political forces, primarily Islamist?” We must not underestimate the ways that unemployment and poverty may lead to the radicalization of youth both here and abroad.

10. Pandemics will threaten local medical resources’ ability to provide adequate medical care. Flu epidemics, tuberculosis, measles and other contagious diseases will make medical management much more onerous. An aging population with chronic conditions will place additional stress on available medical resources. According to the World Health Organization, there is an “emerging global epidemic of diabetes.”

Are these predictions exaggerated? I don’t think so. That advanced degree I mentioned earlier tells me that I have not overstated these predictions; they are credible and approaching quickly. As societies become more complex, yet increasingly related, breakdowns anywhere in the global chain can cause disruptions worldwide.

As risk management professionals, we must do more than simply purchase a coverage portfolio to protect our assets. We must understand and prepare for the societal risks that present unlimited challenges to America’s organizations.