Tag Archives: charles juniper

Global Insurance IT Spending Set to Top $100 Billion

As conditions in insurance markets worldwide slowly improve, CIOs are beginning to re-assess their strategies to drive a new set of IT priorities and are increasing their IT budgets.

The new reality of only modest premium growth in most mature markets is driving focus on simultaneously improving operational efficiency and organizational flexibility. As a result, Ovum is seeing the re-emergence of IT projects focused on legacy system consolidation/transformation and replacement.

Within emerging insurance markets, expanding core platforms and infrastructure to support growth in these regions remains the priority.

Consumers' demands for “anywhere, anytime” interaction continue to drive significant IT investment in digital channels across all regional markets.

These findings come from the latest Ovum Insurance Technology Spend Forecasts, available on the Ovum Knowledge Center. These interactive models provide a highly detailed breakdown of IT spending through 2017, segmented by geography, insurance type, insurance business function, and IT category.

The sharp decline in new business growth across all life insurance markets following the global slowdown led most insurers to rapidly and significantly cut their IT budgets. However, accelerating year-on-year growth in 2013, following some cautious expansion from 2011, confirms that life insurers are now moving from a cost-cutting mindset toward reinvestment in strategic IT projects. Ovum expects this growth in IT budgets to continue at a 7.6% compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) between 2013 and 2017 to reach a global value of just over $49 billion.

IT spending across global non-life insurance markets varies less and has generally lower growth rates. However, Ovum expects IT spending by non-life insurers to grow at a 5.7% CAGR overall to reach $60 billion in 2017. IT spending in the most mature regional markets of North America and Europe will continue to remain significantly greater (at least twice the size) than the faster-growing Asia-Pacific region beyond 2017.

As insurers emerge from short-term cost-cutting, CIOs are beginning to prioritize projects that drive customer acquisition and retention or improve operational effectiveness – ideally both. All insurers should at least be re-assessing their current IT approach to ensure sufficient focus is given to revenue-growth initiatives, to prevent becoming stuck in a “maintenance only” IT strategy.

Within the European markets, intensive competition and prolonged slow premium growth is driving a focus on customer retention, with online portal projects being key IT initiaitives for many life insurers. These initiatives are a critical means of driving process efficiency, reducing operational costs, and responding to the demands of policy-holders for self-service functionality. As the requirements of Solvency II recede and the imperative to deliver sustainable reduction in operational costs becomes increasingly urgent, European life insurers are also refocusing on the issue of legacy system modernization. Legacy systems are not a new concern, but market conditions are now forcing insurers to address the problem. As a result, Ovum expects to see continued expansion of IT budgets in support of consolidation/transformation and core system replacement projects, to reach annual spending of nearly $5 billion by 2017.

A key priority driving IT spending by North American life insurers is the need to comply with emerging regulation such as the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) Solvency Modernization Initiative (SMI). The impact of regulatory compliance on IT budgets will continue to be felt up to 2017, driving spending on enterprise risk management (ERM) and enhanced management information systems (MIS) in particular. Ovum forecasts a 9.7% CAGR in this area.

The Asia-Pacific region will see the most significant growth at an 11.6% CAGR to reach annual IT spending nearing $15 billion by 2017, overtaking the European market to become the second-largest regional market. This expansion is being driven by life insurers needing to “build out” core systems and infrastructure to capture the strong growth opportunities in the region.

The goal of increasing new revenue through greater customer interaction is a critical objective for non-life insurers in both the North American and Asia-Pacific markets. Although North American non-life insurers are already well advanced in terms of online channel deployment and functionality, Ovum expects budgets directly related to digital channels to grow at a 9.0% CAGR, with mobile and social media emerging as the key focus of channel-related IT projects. Among Asia-Pacific non-life insurers, Ovum expects advanced functionality (such as policy application, quotation, payments, claim tracking, etc.) served via digital channels to see rapid development in the next 24 months.

European insurers in general are less advanced in the implementation of digital channels than their North American counterparts, although there is significant variation between individual players. However, Ovum expects this gap to rapidly diminish as the deployment of online portals and mobile channels emerges as a key priority from 2013 onward. IT spending in support of digital channels will grow at a 7.4% CAGR to 2017, with much of this growth occurring early on.

Insurers Rearm To Fight Professional Fraudsters

Many insurers are redesigning their strategies to deliver systems that forestall attempted fraud, adapt to changing fraud techniques, and are applied at all points of interaction between a policyholder and an insurer. This change is driven by the alarming increase in professional fraud networks in the last five years and the realization that an effective fraud strategy can provide a competitive advantage in the currently very difficult market conditions.

A number of technologies have now matured to a level where, when used in combination, they offer insurers highly effective means of detecting and preventing even the most sophisticated fraud schemes. As a result, these technologies—which include predictive analytics, link analysis, text mining, in-memory database, and cloud services—will become significant areas of investment for insurers during the next 12–24 months.

A recent Ovum report, Tackling Insurance Fraud, discusses the reasons behind the increased focus on insurance fraud and explains how a range of technologies can be applied to implement a comprehensive and effective insurance fraud system.

Professional fraudsters use sophisticated schemes—such as staged or induced auto accidents, life insurance owned by strangers, or false hit-and-run claims—to illegally obtain significant sums from insurers. Professional fraud schemes often involve complex networks of criminal players within medical services providers, auto repair centers, hospitals, insurance agents, or even insurance companies. The volume of organized professional fraud is low in comparison with that of opportunist fraud by amateurs, but the sums being claimed illegally by an individual group can amount to many tens of thousands of dollars and, in some cases, millions.

The vast majority of insurers have already invested, to some degree, in fraud technology. Although this investment has delivered benefits, it has tended to take a piecemeal approach. Investment is usually focused only on the claims phase. Technology used today is generally not sufficient to address the growing problem of professional insurance fraud.

The continued fragility of many developed economies means that insurance markets will remain extremely competitive for at least the next 36 months, with only muted premium growth, limited room for rate increases, and investment returns that will remain volatile. So, insurers are urgently seeking ways to significantly and sustainably reduce both administration and claims costs. As claims payments typically account for 80% of an insurer's costs (excluding administration costs), reducing them by decreasing the level of fraudulent payouts can have a significant impact on a carrier’s cost base and margins.

With the Association of British Insurers (ABI) estimating that fraud currently adds approximately £50 to each auto policy, an effective fraud strategy can drive significant competitive advantage in a tough market by allowing insurers to reduce premium levels. An effective fraud strategy can also bring additional service benefits. In particular, simplifying and expediting the processing of legitimate claims increases the likelihood that a policy-holder will renew a policy.

There is no single “silver bullet” technology that can fully address the issue of complex insurance fraud. However, technology areas such as predictive analytics, text mining, link analysis, in-memory databases, and cloud services, together with fraud technologies commonly used today (such as rules-based systems and anomaly detection) can be combined to create highly effective systems that detect even the most sophisticated and complex fraud schemes. These systems are able to detect and adapt even to previously unknown fraud techniques that may be employed by professional fraudsters.

To date, most insurers have focused their fraud strategies on the claims process. While this is a critical point at which to detect potential fraud, the effectiveness of a fraud strategy, particularly in avoiding organized criminal fraud, can be significantly enhanced by using technology across the entire insurance product lifecycle. It is now possible to apply technology in real time, at multiple points at which insurers and policyholders interact. For example, the use of link analysis can stop fraud by identifying applicants with connections to others that have either committed fraud or are suspected of doing so.

Professional fraudsters can be very sophisticated. Insurers need to keep rearming themselves if they are to win the battle and help themselves thrive in a tough market.