Tag Archives: cell phone

Cars That Self-Assess Accidents

“Star Trek” fans love to point out that, over the last five decades, many of the show’s futuristic technologies have gone from science fiction to fact. Mobile communicators (cell phones), non-invasive surgery (focused ultrasound surgery), food replicators (3D printers) and phasers (now being tested by the U.S. military) are but a few examples.

But in its own way, a show in the 1980s was just as prescient: “Knight Rider”– a show about the exploits of Michael Knight (David Hasselhoff) and his car KITT, a talking, thinking and feeling car is nearly spot on.

In the show, this highly autonomous vehicle could map locations, conduct video calls and talk much like Apple’s Siri system. In reality that’s headed our way, automobiles that feel and virtually think will be made possible by technologies that include augmented reality, microscopic sensors and mini-microprocessors. These technologies will enable vehicles to perform a variety of tasks now done by humans – from assessing the damage caused by accidents and ordering replacement parts to booking rental cars and assessing liability.

Tomorrow’s vehicles will, in part, assume the roles of insurance adjusters, collision-repair technicians and drivers. And “tomorrow” may not be too far off.

“Smart Skin”

Already, engineers at the British defense, security and aerospace company BAE are developing a “smart skin” – a thin surface that could be embedded with thousands of micro-sensors (aka “motes”). The company says that when this layer is applied to an aircraft, it will gain the ability to sense wind speed, temperature, physical strain and movement with a high degree of accuracy.

According to several articles, the micro-sensors could be as small as dust particles and could be sprayed on the surface of the aircraft (and on a car or truck). The motes would have their own power source and, when paired with the right software, communicate in much the same way that human skin communicates with the brain.

Once sensory and virtual-reality technologies have evolved to the point where our vehicles can genuinely “feel” and evaluate changes to themselves and their environment, the main thing needed to complete this automotive Internet of  Things will be data – lots of real-time data that is freely exchanged between car owners, insurance companies, auto repair shops and auto manufacturers. Achieving a consensus among consumers and corporations about when, what and how much data should be exchanged may be a sticking point, but, once that agreement is reached, it will be just a matter of time before self-diagnosing cars start hitting the roads.

The Car of Tomorrow

Imagine a future in which your car is covered with an intelligent “skin” that monitors every component and function – from the engine to the exterior sheet metal.

Now imagine the moment your car gets into an accident. The car will instantly calculate how much damage has been done, where it was done and what needs to be repaired or replaced. This information will be quickly ascertained and collected by the vehicle’s computer. From there, it will be transmitted to the cloud, where it can be downloaded by a repair facility or insurance company. By viewing a three-dimensional virtual-reality image of the automobile, the repair technician and insurance adjuster could literally “see” – and almost feel and touch – the damage.

Imagine a time when all that damage is self-assessed by the vehicle. It diagnoses itself, feeds the information into estimating software and tells the collision-repair shop what needs to be done. The vehicle also determines how long repairs should take and even orders parts by automatically sourcing suppliers. All this ensures that your vehicle is fixed ASAP. In addition, your hyper-smart car can order a rental, so you’ll have alternative transportation while the claim is being processed.

All the information regarding your accident – the speed at which you were traveling, location, direction of travel, etc. – will be instantly transmitted to your insurer, enabling the adjuster to make more educated decisions. Think of all that information being fed to a predictive, cognitive claims system that can make intelligent recommendations, helping consumers receive the best possible outcome on every claim.

This is the future – an era when data, sensor and cognitive computing technology are meshed to create a seamless auto claims process that speeds repairs, handles claims more efficiently and provides an amazing customer experience.

Your Device Is Private? Ask Tom Brady

However you feel about Tom Brady, the Patriots and football air pressure, today is a learning moment about cell phones and evidence. If you think the NFL had no business demanding the quarterback’s personal cell phone—and, by extension, that your company has no business demanding to see your cell phone—you’re probably wrong. In fact, your company may very well find itself legally obligated to take data from your private cell phone.

New Norm

Welcome to the wacky world of BYOD—bring your own device. The intermingling of personal and work data on devices has created a legal mess for corporations that won’t be cleared up soon. BYOD is a really big deal—nearly three-quarters of all companies now allow workers to connect with private devices, or plan to soon. For now, you should presume that if you use a personal computer or cell phone to access company files or email, that gadget may very well be subject to discovery requirements.

Security & Privacy Weekly News Roundup: Stay informed of key patterns and trends

First, let’s get this out of the way: Anyone who thinks Tom Brady’s alleged destruction of his personal cell phone represents obstruction of justice is falling for the NFL’s misdirection play. That news was obviously leaked on purpose to make folks think Brady is a bad guy. But even he couldn’t be dumb enough to think destruction of a handset was tantamount to destruction of text message evidence. That’s not how things work in the connected world. The messages might persist on the recipients’ phones and on the carriers’ servers, easily accessible with a court order. The leak was just designed to distract people. (And I’m a Giants fan with a fan’s dislike of the Patriots).

But back to the main point: I’ve heard folks say that the NFL had no right to ask Brady to turn over his personal cell phone. “Right” is a vague term here, because we are still really talking about an employment dispute, and I don’t know all the terms of NFL players’ employment contracts. But here’s what you need to know:

Technology and the Law

There’s a pretty well-established set of court rulings that hold that employers facing a civil or criminal case must produce data on employees’ personal computers and gadgets if the employer has good reason to believe there might be relevant work data on them.

Practically speaking, that can mean taking a phone or a computer away from a worker and making an image of it to preserve any evidence that might exist. That doesn’t give the employer carte blanche to examine everything on the phone, but it does create pretty wide latitude to examine anything that might be relevant to a case. For example: In a workplace discrimination case, lawyers might examine (and surrender) text messages, photos, websites visited and so on.

It’s not a right, it’s a duty. In fact, when I first examined this issue for NBCNews, Michael R. Overly, a technology law expert in Los Angeles, told me he knew of a case where a company actually was sanctioned by a court for failing to search devices during discovery.

Work Gets Personal

“People’s lives revolve around their phone, and they are going to become more and more of a target in litigation,” Overly said then. “Employees really do need to understand that.”

There is really only one way to avoid this perilous state of affairs—use two cell phones, and never mix business with personal. Even that is a challenge, as the temptation to check work email with a personal phone is great, particularly when cell phone batteries die so frequently.

The moral of the story: The definition of “personal” is shrinking all the time, even if you don’t believe Tom Brady shrank those footballs.

For further reading: here’s a nice summary of case law.