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Blueprint for Suicide Prevention

On Sept. 3, 2015, a press release was issued by the Carson J Spencer Foundation; RK, a construction company in Denver; and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. This press release was timed to coincide with Suicide Prevention Month in September and World Suicide Prevention Day on Sept. 10 . This press release announced the distribution of A Blueprint for the Construction Industry: Suicide Prevention in the Workplace (aka The Blueprint). One year later, we believe  that this document was a catalyst in developing a national movement in suicide prevention in construction. This articles tracks the milestones of this movement and future directions.

In 2010, the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention and its Workplace Task Force were launched in conjunction with World Suicide Prevention Day. The co-authors served as inaugural members of the Workplace Force. The Blueprint was intended to create awareness, generate advocacy and spur action in the construction industry around suicide prevention. In addition, The Blueprint provided a toolkit for how to discuss mental health and suicide prevention in the construction industry.

Equipped with The Blueprint, the co-authors began an initiative to break the silence and create a culture of caring. The co-authors sought to gain the attention of the construction industry through a media saturation campaign. The intent was to build a reproducible model within the construction industry that could subsequently be used as a reproducible model by other industries. In short, the coauthors sought to integrate mental health and suicide prevention in safety, health, wellness and employee benefit programs by framing the topics as the “next frontier in safety.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a report that placed the construction and extraction industry as second-highest in the nation for suicide rates.

But, a year later, The Blueprint has exceeded expectations. It spawned an outpouring of targeted action that is rippling throughout the construction industry. The impact has been felt in: publications, presentations, projects and partnerships.

Publications

The publishing of The Blueprint created demand for articles by major independent construction industry publications and those published by trade associations. There have been at least 28 unique articles published since the first one was posted online by the Construction Financial Management Association (CFMA) on Nov. 1, 2015.

See also: Union Pacific Leads on Suicide Prevention

These articles have included both in-print and online versions. The articles have begun to cross over from construction into architecture and engineering, to make this an issue that is being discussed in the integrated AEC industry. The articles have penetrated major industry brands, including Engineering News-Record (ENR); the Associated General Contractors of America’s Constructor; CFMA’s Building Profits; Associated Builders and Contractor’s Construction Executive; Construction Business Owner; and the National Association of Women in Construction’s Image.

Presentations

Once articles were appearing in industry publications, it was easier to solicit presentations. The first presentation that Cal Beyer gave regarding suicide prevention was the September 2015 CFMA Southwest Regional Conference, where he included suicide prevention as part of his company’s commitment to Safety 24/7: safety at work, home and play. The second presentation he delivered was to the South Sound Chapter of the National Association of Women in Construction in November 2015 near Seattle. These two early successes made it easier to “sell” the concept of presentations.

Sally Spencer-Thomas presented at the January 2016 Men’s Health Conversation at the White House in January 2016, while Beyer presented at the pre-meeting at the Department of Health and Human Services. The next two presentations were led by Spencer-Thomas in February 2016 at an executive roundtable sponsored by Lendlease in Chicago and to the Associated General Contractors of Washington. More than 100 attendees heard Beyer’s presentation at the Pacific Northwest Forum of the National Association of Women in Construction in April 2016. Two sessions were facilitated at the CFMA Annual Conference in June 2016. Similar sessions were offered in Portland, OR, in June to the AGC of Oregon and in Boise, ID, in July for the Idaho Chapter of CFMA .

The marquee event was held in Phoenix on April 7, 2016, when more than 100 attendees participated in the CFMA’s Regional Suicide Prevention Summit. Similar summits are scheduled by CFMA chapters for Charlotte on Nov. 9, 2016, in Portland, on Nov. 16 and Chicago on Feb. 17, 2017. A series of summits have been proposed by numerous CFMA chapters in 2017, including: Denver; Washington, DC.; Indianapolis; Houston; and Las Vegas.

Projects and Partnerships

The first partnership was established with CFMA through publications — including the first article as well as two custom PDF publications highlighting both the “why” and “how” to address suicide prevention in construction companies. Moreover, CFMA launched the aforementioned Construction Industry Alliance for Suicide Prevention and created an executive committee task force.

Clare Miller, the Executive Director of the Partnership for Workplace Mental Health, has been distributing periodic updates on the construction industry to her organization’s members. A partnership was formed with the JP Griffin Group, an employee benefits consultancy in Scottsdale, AZ. The Griffin Group created artwork for four custom poster templates that has been provided to the construction industry at no charge. Hoop 5 Networks, an IT system consulting company from San Diego, provided web development services for the Construction Working Minds website maintained by the Carson J Spencer Foundation.

Union Pacific invited Spencer-Thomas and Beyer to present in Omaha at the Railroad Suicide Prevention Summit on Aug. 24, 2016, so that rail industry leaders could transfer the lessons learned from construction to their own industry. Likewise, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs requested the construction industry be represented at its roundtable on suicide prevention on Aug. 30, 2016. While Beyer was not able to attend, he invited representatives from the CFMA and ABC associations to attend.

See also: A Manager’s Response to Workplace Suicide  

Finally, the best example of the growing partnership is the creation of a construction subcommittee on the workplace task force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. There are now nine members on this subcommittee, and it is the largest subcommittee of the workplace task force. These subcommittee members represent a broad cross-section of the construction industry. The nine subcommittee members are:

  1. Cal Beyer; Risk Management Director; Lakeside Industries, Inc. (Issaquah, WA)
  2. Dr. Morgan Hembree; Leadership Consultant; Integrated Leadership System (Columbus, OH)
  3. David James; CFO; FNF, Inc. (Tempe, AZ)
  4. Tricia Kagerer; Risk Management Executive; American Contractors Insurance Group (ACIG); Dallas.
  5. Joe Patti; Vice President & CFO; Welsbach Electric Corporation (College Point, NY)
  6. Christian Moreno; Vice President; Health Risk Solutions; Lockton Dunning (Dallas)
  7. Bob Swanson; Retired President; Swanson & Youngdale, Inc. (Minneapolis)
  8. Sally Spencer-Thomas, CEO, Carson J Spencer Foundation (Denver)
  9. Bob VandePol; Executive Director, Employee Assistance program; Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services (Grand Rapids, MI)
  10. Michelle Walker; Vice President Finance & Administration; Spec ialized Services Company (Phoenix)

Conclusion

Thus, in less than one year, the construction industry has moved from not thinking about suicide prevention to being a leading industry in the effort. In fact, in May 2015, Forbes published an article called, “What Construction Workers Could Teach Other Industries About Mental Health Awareness.” This demonstrated how broadly this awakening and action has been felt.

This first phase of garnering awareness and political will is critical in starting this national movement. The next phase is to institutionalize these efforts by bringing best practices in suicide prevention to companies, researching outcomes to better understand what works and developing policy and procedures that support mentally healthy, resilient and psychologically safe workplaces.

How to Help Veterans on Mental Health

The constant beat of the major media drum often paints a grim picture of veterans and suicide. Sometimes, we wonder if these messages become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Consistent headlines include data such as:

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  • Approximately 22 veterans die by suicide each day (about one every 65 minutes).
  • In 2012, suicide deaths outpaced combat deaths, with 349 active-duty suicides; on average about one per day.
  • The suicide rate among veterans (30 per 100,000) is double the civilian rate.

Listening to this regular narrative, a collective concern and urgency emerges on how best to support our veterans who are making the transition back to civilian jobs and communities. Many veterans have a number of risk factors for suicide, contributing to the dire suicide statistics, including:

  • A strong identity in a fearless, stoic, risk-taking and macho culture
  • Exposure to trauma and possible traumatic brain injury
  • Self-medication through substance abuse
  • Stigmatizing views of mental illness
  • Access to and familiarity with lethal means (firearms)

Veterans show incredible resilience and resourcefulness when facing daunting challenges and learn how to cope, but employers and others who would like to support veterans are not always clear on how to be a “military-friendly community.”

The Carson J Spencer Foundation and our Man Therapy partners Cactus and Colorado’s Office of Suicide Prevention conducted a six-month needs and strengths assessment involving two in-person focus groups and two national focus groups with representation from Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps and family perspectives.

When asked how we could best reach them, what issues they’d like to see addressed and what resources they need, here is what veterans and their advocates told us:

  • “I think that when you reach out to the vets, do it with humor and compassion…Give them something to talk about in the humor; they will come back when no one is looking for the compassion.” People often mentioned they preferred a straightforward approach that wasn’t overly statistical, clinical or wordy.
  • Make seeking help easy. A few veterans mentioned they liked an anonymous opportunity to check out their mental health from the privacy of their own home. Additionally, a concern exists among veterans, who assume some other service member would need a resource more. They hesitate to seek help, in part, because they don’t want to take away a resource from “someone who may really need it.” Having universal access through the Internet gets around this issue.
  • “We need to honor the warrior in transition. The loss of identity is a big deal, along with camaraderie and cohesion. Who I was, who I am now, who I am going to be…” The top request for content was about how to manage the transition from military life to civilian life. The loss of identity and not knowing who “has your back” is significant. Several veterans were incredibly concerned about being judged for PTS (no “D,” for disorder – as the stress they experience is a normal response to an abnormal situation). Veterans also requested content about: post-traumatic stress and growth, traumatic brain injury, military sexual trauma and fatherhood and relationships, especially during deployment.
  • The best ways to reach veterans: trusted peers, family members and leaders with “vicarious credibility.”

Because of these needs and suggestions, an innovative online tool called “Man Therapy” now offers male military/veterans a new way to self-assess for mental health challenges and link to resources.

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In addition to mental health support, many other things can be done to support veterans:

We owe it to our service members to provide them with resources and support and to listen carefully to the challenges and barriers that prevent them from fully thriving. Learn how you can be part of the solution instead of just focusing on the problem.

A Manager’s Response to Workplace Suicide

There are more than 41,000 suicide deaths per year in the U.S; the majority occur among people of working age. This number alone can dramatically affect the workplace. Add to this number that there are about six people affected, many being coworkers, for every suicide death, and the potential impact to the workplace quickly becomes evident.

Even workplaces with the most comprehensive suicide prevention policies and programs are not immune from a suicide that occurs at work or off-site. Because of the high likelihood that at some point a workplace will experience an employee suicide (or a suicide by a client, vendor or employee family member), it is critical that managers know how to respond and facilitate appropriate “postvention” services designed to help employees and the organization recover and return to normal. Postvention services include psychological first aid, crisis intervention and other support services that managers can facilitate for employees following a workplace suicide or suicide attempt.

In 2013, the Workplace Postvention Task Force of the American Association of Suicidology and the Workplace Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, in partnership with the Carson J Spencer Foundation and Crisis Care Network, wrote, “A Manager’s Guide to Suicide in the Workplace: 10 Action Steps for Dealing with the Aftermath of a Suicide.” The guide has been evaluated by managers in diverse work organizations, including by leaders in human resources, management, safety, occupational health and wellness and employee assistance programs. The overwhelming feedback about the guide was that it is useful; workplace leaders who reviewed the guide but have not yet experienced a workplace suicide plan to keep the guide as a resource.

As the title of the guide implies, it provides managers with 10 specific actions they can take following a workplace suicide. The actions are divided into phases to help the manager work through the acute phase, recovery phase and reconstructing phase. Additional useful tools for managers include how to draft notification memos and prepare external announcements to disseminate to the broader workplace and the media. Some of the most useful tools in the guide include checklists for how to implement each action, descriptions of how to identify roles for managers during the response, instructions for following crisis decision-making flowcharts and templates for drafting crisis communication messages. The overwhelming majority of users said they would recommend this resource to other managers.

This blog is designed to encourage you to look at the guide and consider using it as a resource, should the need arise in your workplace. We also welcome your feedback on suggestions to make the guide more useful to all workplace leaders. Feedback can be sent to the senior program director at the Carson J Spencer Foundation, jess@carsonjspencer.org. With so many working-aged adults dying by suicide each year, managers need to be prepared to deal with such a crisis. This guide provides concrete steps managers can follow after a suicide to psychologically support their workforce and provide leadership to the work organization as they work to return quickly to normal operations.

Stand Up for Robin Williams. . .

On Monday, Aug. 11, 2014, we lost Robin Williams. He was a brilliant actor and comic…a man most of us grew up with. We knew him as a funny guy, an alien, a genie, a nanny, an inspirational teacher and so much more. We also knew he struggled with depression, addiction and possibly bipolar disorder.

Collectively, we grieve for his loss. Williams had an uncanny ability to make us smile. Even when playing more dramatic roles, he brought light, laughter and inspiration to our lives.

We grieve, too, for thousands of other people who have died by suicide. Fathers, mothers, sisters, daughters, sons, brothers…suicide isn’t just about the person who dies. Its painful ripples spread far and wide, affecting every one of us.

We believe every suicide death is preventable, that not another person should die in desperation and alone. Those with behavioral health challenges like major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia have suicide rates 10 to 15 times greater than the general population. Yet, millions survive, and many find a way to thrive. Recovery is possible!

The bitter irony of Williams’ death was the support he gave for another disease that takes lives: cancer. Williams was a strong backer of St. Jude’s Research Center and Stand Up to Cancer. He would visit cancer patients, sometimes in their own homes, bringing joy into lives that would invariably be cut short, just as Williams’ was.

The cancer prevention movement has been so effective in getting people involved – in prevention, in fundraising, in advocacy.  Now many people – whether or not they’ve been directly affected by cancer – Stand Up in solidarity to help fight the battle. They stand shoulder to shoulder with people who are fighting for their lives? They stand to honor those who’ve passed with dignity. They got people like Robin Williams to lean in, and say, “I care. What can I do to help?”

The suicide prevention movement can learn a lot from the successes of the cancer prevention movement.

How has the cancer prevention movement achieved its goals? It advanced science and promoted stories of hope and recovery. Those who want to stand up for suicide prevention can do this, too.

As Dr. Sean Maguire in the movie “Good Will Hunting,” Williams counsels Matt Damon’s Will Hunting on life, love and grief before telling him, “Your move, chief.”

Now it’s our move. Let’s honor Williams’ memory, and that of every person who has died by suicide, by making suicide a thing of the past.  What can you do to Stand Up for suicide prevention?

  • Reach out and ask others who may be going through difficult life challenges, “Are you okay? What can I do to support you?” Let them know they are not alone and that you can help them link to resources.
  • Promote the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (800-273-8255) everywhere – schools, workplaces, faith communities, neighborhoods.
  • Volunteer and participate in suicide prevention work like community walks, town hall meetings, crisis line support and more.
  • Donate to suicide prevention organizations.
  • Learn about the real facts about suicide and the strategies that have been shown to prevent it.
  • Then bring others into the circle – your healthcare providers, your employer, your educators and so on. Elevate the conversation and make suicide prevention a health and safety priority.
  • Ask your healthcare plan and provider to join you.

As a society, we’ve stood up for so many other important things. It’s time for us to stand up to suicide.

When we all stand up and move together, we create a movement. Together, our voices can create significant change in systems, in policy, in funding and in the general view of suicide. We can restore dignity and offer hope and empowerment and save lives.

This article was written by Sally Spencer-Thomas with four other members of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention:

  • David Covington, LPC, MBA, Recovery Innovations and Zero Suicide Advisory Group
  • John Draper, National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and The Way Forward Suicide Attempt Survivors Task Force
  • Mike Hogan, Hogan Health Services and Zero Suicide Advisory Group
  • Eduardo Vega, Mental Health Association of San Francisco and The Way Forward Suicide Attempt Survivors Task Force

#standup2suicide #zerosuicide #wayforward

Preventing Suicide in Working-Age Men

Around the world, men of working age carry the burden of suicide. In the U.S., suicide is the second leading cause of death for men ages 25-54. Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women. Because just about all of these men are working, were recently working or have family members who are working, the workplace is a prime place to make suicide a health and safety priority. This week, as Men’s Health Week is celebrated internationally, here are some ways business leaders can help tie in messaging about mental health to help create a resilient workforce.

Men’s Health Week advocates that the best way to improve male health is to tackle the most important health issues relevant to men, and mental health plays a big role in men’s overall health. As workplace leaders, we should investigate how job stress and workplace environments contribute to or protect from mental health challenges.

According to a groundbreaking and provocative book by internationally renowned clinical psychologist Dr. Thomas Joiner called Lonely at the Top, men appear to enjoy many advantages in society that should give them protection from mental health challenges, but often do not. On average, men of working age have greater incomes and more power and experience a greater degree of social freedom than women or than males at other times of the lifespan. However, many men pay a high price for the pursuit of all that success. Too often, men take family and friends for granted in the chase for top rank and ambitious goals and find themselves alone when hard times hit. As a result, many turn to maladaptive coping like prescription drug and alcohol abuse, affairs and other forms of self-destruction, which in turn can fuel cycles of increasing depression and anxiety.

As one book reviewer states, “If there is one thing we know it’s that whatever society rewards is what you will see more of. Have you seen the Forbes list of the 500 foremost people who provide love, friendship, support and laughter in the world? Nope.”

In the never-ending chase to bigger, better, more, business leaders often encourage this damaging pattern, and many top performers end up burning out or worse. Instead, by encouraging wellness and relationships, leaders can help their talent keep up the levels of productivity so necessary in the long term.

Resources for men’s mental health are few, and many are ineffective because many men don’t find them relevant. Recently, an innovative resource has emerged that gives men an opportunity to understand their distress in new ways; self-assess for levels of depression, anxiety, substance abuse and anger; and create a blueprint for change. This tool, called Man Therapy, uses humor to cut through social barriers and get men talking, thinking and supporting each other when stress becomes unmanageable.

What can workplaces do? Here are six things to do:

— Promote the Man Therapy program through newsletters, social media and more. Several compelling videos can help with this, and they can be found here.
— Train employees on how best to identify people in emerging distress and link them to qualified help before the situation becomes overwhelming. For more information, visit WorkingMinds.org.
— Host lunch-and-learn brown bag presentations on mental health topics as part of your overall wellness program.
— Audit policies to see if yours is a “mentally health workplace” – more here.
— Provide tools to help employees screen themselves (e.g., “Workplace Response”) for mental health conditions – more here.
— Find ways to reward emotional intelligence, mental wellness and community service to help create a sense of belonging and meaningful purpose at work.

Take time to focus on men’s mental health during Men’s Health Week – it might not only improve morale and productivity at work; it might just save some lives.