Tag Archives: CAGR

How to Remove the Roadblock for UBI

Once upon a time, the auto insurance industry relied on motor vehicle reports, drivers’ records, business addresses, financial credit reports, claims histories, policyholder-stated VIN and mileage information, etc. to make an underwriting and rating decision. This scant information provided a fuzzy picture of risk, at best, so insurers built in a pricing cushion to protect against losses and figured it all out at the end of the year.

Fast forward to today, and insurers have volumes of real-world driving data at their fingertips to inform more precise underwriting and pricing. With the proliferation of telematics devices, whether after-market or factory-installed, and mobile tracking and recording apps, we now can know where, when and how an individual vehicle is driven. We can know area and hours of operation, driving behavior, route histories, vehicle performance characteristics and much, much more. We can even re-create collisions using the data.

With data-driven usage-based insurance (UBI), we now can formulate a clear picture of driving risk and remove the guesswork. In short, we have the potential to write for a group of one, based on observable, verifiable data.

Some numbers to consider:

  • Currently nearly 30% of all commercial vehicles have some form of telematics device installed. This figure is expected to reach 70% in 2017. (C.J. Driscoll & Associates)
  • Today’s telematics devices record nearly 300 billion miles of driving data annually.
  • 94% of all small businesses report using smartphones in their businesses. (2014 AT&T-SBE Council Small Business Technology Poll)
  • Approximately 30 auto manufacturers (original equipment manufacturers, or OEMs) are busily equipping vehicles with data devices today.
  • More than 70 telematics service provider (TSP) fleet management services companies in the U.S. are equipping trucks, cars and utility vehicles with telematics.
  • More than half of small fleet managers are likely to stay with their current insurance carriers if their insurer offers UBI (Lexis Nexis’ 2015 Commercial Usage-Based Insurance Study)
  • Global sales of insurance telematics products are projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 80% from 2013-2018, and the subscriber base is expected to reach 85.5 million in 2018. (Research & Markets).

We are quickly reaching a tipping point for UBI programs that rely on data collection and analysis as the basis for a “pay how you drive” approach to auto insurance.

However, insurers looking to take advantage of this driving data face some tough questions: Where does all this data come from? How is it collected? How can different data sets be normalized? How can insurers store, analyze and manage such a huge volume of data?

The solution for insurers large and small very likely will be a telematics data clearinghouse.

Multiple Data Sources: OEMs, TSPs, Mobile Apps and More

The first problem insurers face is negotiating with 70 different TSPs and 30 OEMs for their data, which adds complexity, time and expense to the process of acquiring the driving data needed for an effective UBI program. A clearinghouse solves the problem of accessing data on millions of vehicles by aggregating data from available sources. Rather than negotiate with dozens of data suppliers, an insurance carrier merely subscribes to the clearinghouse for access to all of that data, at a single price. 

Multiple Formats: Not All Data Is the Same

With so many data sources, each using different telematics devices and software, pulling data from different types of vehicles, the aggregated data is a jumble of formats, with no two data sets the same. A clearinghouse plays a critical part in scrubbing, authenticating and normalizing this data for handoff to underwriting.

Making Big Data Digestible… One Byte at a Time

UBI represents a monstrously big IT effort for an individual insurer. With nearly 300 billion miles of driving data available, we’re talking about petabytes of data to acquire and analyze. Even the largest insurers must weigh the benefits of devoting precious IT resources to developing and running a complete UBI data collection, storage and analysis effort. In contrast, a clearinghouse is built to manage big data in a big way, delivering a clean, authenticated data set to the insurer, integrated seamlessly into the underwriting process for easy access and use.

Evolution of a Safe-Driving Scoring Standard

With access to data from millions of vehicles, a clearinghouse is also able to provide comparative analytics and calculate a fleet’s safe-driving score, the driving equivalent of a FICO financial credit score and a much more accurate predictor of risk. A complement to current driver score cards offered by many TSPs (which measure individual driving behaviors such as speeding, harsh braking and hard cornering), a fleet score factors in all drivers, as well as the vehicles they drive and the environment in which they drive. The fleet score analyzes variables including weather, time of day, road surface and traffic dynamics. An overall fleet safety score compares fleets of similar SIC codes and territories to derive an indexed score and ranking – a meaningful risk assessment and underwriting tool more powerful than anything else in use today.

Data Privacy and Protection: Permission-Based

Yet another crucial role played by a clearinghouse is data protection and privacy. Clearly, the vehicle owner owns the data generated by that vehicle in the course of a driving trip. But once it is in the UBI transaction chain, how is that data protected? Who sees it, and what is done with it? The clearinghouse serves as gatekeeper. With the consent of the vehicle owner/policyholder, the clearinghouse facilitates the secure sharing of encrypted data with the insurer, allowing the data owner to control who sees the data and why. Such protection encourages voluntary participation by vehicle owners, helping fuel the growth of UBI. 

Data Transparency and Portability: You CAN Take It with You

Data transparency and portability go hand-in-hand with data ownership. As a consent-based data sharing service, the clearinghouse offers complete transparency to the data owner. The vehicle owner knows what data is being requested and has the option of permitting or denying access. The clearinghouse allows the data owner to share his data and driving safety score with multiple insurers.

Data Clearinghouse or Data Exchange: What’s the Difference?

Aggregated driving data services are taking different forms. While all share the purpose of providing a “one-stop” storehouse of driving and vehicle data, they do not all operate in the same manner or provide the same services.

The primary distinction can be explained as an open marketplace vs. a closed system.

As an open market, a clearinghouse merely facilitates the transfer of data from vehicle owner or TSP to insurer. The insurer then underwrites a policy based on this data (and other factors the insurer deems important) and determines a policy premium. In this open system, there are no regulatory filings required; data is used in the insurer’s existing underwriting process, and the insurer retains complete control over pricing, applying credits as warranted. Furthermore, the marketplace determines the value of the data: How much is an insurer willing to pay for detailed trip histories, for example?

In contrast, an exchange uses driving and vehicle data to compute a rating and pricing recommendation for the insurer. Because the exchange is determining price, this rating system must be filed with state regulators. In this closed system, the exchange assumes the role of underwriter and pricing specialist, leaving the insurer with little room for proprietary pricing, segmentation or differentiation. The exchange controls the data and the insurance product.

Data-Driven, UBI: A Return to Profitable Auto Underwriting

UBI offers auto insurance carriers an unprecedented view of vehicle use and driving behavior. Insurers that embrace UBI and develop a data-driven underwriting and ratings process will benefit from more consistent underwriting, improved segmentation and better selection. Those that do not will likely suffer from adverse selection and an underperforming book of business.

The key to successful UBI adoption will be access to, normalization of and correct interpretation of all this data. Undoubtedly, auto insurance carriers will be hearing more about the clearinghouse concept and the pivotal role it plays in UBI.

Insurance Risk in Latin America

Latin America’s compound growth remains attractive and yet, overall, insurance penetration rates still remain low in many countries. Particularly in life insurance, despite continuing economic growth and reduced poverty levels, penetration is low, suggesting there is still significant growth ahead for the insurance sector. We have seen significant reforms across the region from both a fiscal and regulatory standpoint, in everything from capital and exchange controls to consumer protection. We believe a key challenge for insurers over the next decade is navigating this rapid acceleration toward modern regulatory and operational realities.

Around the world, regulators are setting the expectation that insurers will raise their game. The trend is clear, toward better risk management, better governance, more precise measurement of capital in a risk sensitive way and more detailed and transparent reporting to regulators.

We presented our first report for Latin America in 2012, focusing on risk-based capital (RBC) and emerging regulations in four markets: Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico. We have expanded our coverage and also added Colombia, Peru and Uruguay to our new overview.

In the past two years, each Latin American market has faced a different journey to a risk- and economic value-based solvency framework. More open markets in the Pacific Alliance (Chile and Mexico) have enhanced their risk management processes, while Brazil is seeking Solvency II equivalence by 2016. Mexico’s new law, modeled on Solvency II, is likely to be implemented ahead
of the rest of the world. Peru and Uruguay have no immediate plans to pursue a Solvency II approach. Although both countries are attracting foreign investment, the market size and number of players are impeding regulation. With Argentina’s high inflation and economic concerns, adopting an RBC framework in the short term is unlikely.

The challenge to understanding Latin America remains that most insurers in the region are not well-prepared for the expected changes in governance, risk management, capital requirements and reporting. At EY, we believe that effective risk management and the ability to quantify and price risks accurately are a core competence for a successful insurance company. We also observe globally that the leading insurers will typically look to define their own vision for their capabilities in these key areas, rather than simply following the iteration of each piece of regulation. Leading firms will also typically go on to deploy these capabilities more quickly and effectively across their businesses at the point of decision making, and being ahead of competitors in this way is a source of clear commercial advantage.

Argentina

The Argentine insurance market has made minimal progress in its approach to RBC in recent years. As other Latin American countries take steps toward Solvency II equivalence, Argentina is only superficially addressing this issue. In a country experiencing high inflation, tight regulation and fluctuating economic market concerns, RBC is only one in a long list of initiatives on the regulatory agenda of the Superintendencia de Seguros de la Nación (SSN).

Nevertheless, insurance is a fast-growing industry that continues to show resilience in premiums and tolerance for expansion in a challenging environment. Annual growth percentages are measured in Argentine pesos, so the inflation rate has a significant impact on those figures. As of 30 June 2013 (last fiscal year-end), there were 184 companies (108 in property/casualty) writing insurance in Argentina – with 29 new companies added in the past two years. International players continue to make acquisitions to enhance their positions in the industry. Growth has been most prominent in workers’ compensation and motor insurance, producing increases of 42% and 35%, respectively, from June 2012 to June 2013.

Brazil

The Brazilian insurance market continues to achieve double-digit growth. The industry is witnessing a series of mergers and acquisitions and the arrival of multinational insurance and reinsurance companies, mostly from Europe. In addition, the sector experienced the largest initial public offering in the world last year, when BB Seguridade raised approximately US$5.75 billion in the BOVESPA stock exchange.

Although national bancassurance players dominate the Brazilian insurance market, international insurance companies continue to grow at a higher rate through M&A and strategic alliances.

Given the continuous growth in the market, the Brazilian regulator, Superintendência de Seguros Privados (SUSEP), is working with the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) to achieve Solvency ll equivalence in Brazil. This will facilitate the investment of European insurance companies in Brazil and Brazilian companies in Europe. SUSEP will sign an agreement that will adopt Solvency ll rules partially or fully by 2016, based on a comparative study that EIOPA will perform to measure Brazilian regulation against the Solvency II regime.

Chile

The insurance market in Chile continues to shift from its present regulatory framework to a more sophisticated RBC approach to solvency assessment that better reflects current industry risks. New methodology proposed by the Superintendencia de Valores y Seguros (SVS) is an important step toward building an integral and holistic RBC model.

The Comframe capital framework implementation requires each risk category to be managed individually, with most supervision on a product-by-product basis. Most insurers will need to improve their risk function or implement a holistic approach to risk management. Also, local skilled resources are scarce for the level of technical knowledge imposed by this regulation. Many will need to develop better data analytics, systems and precise risk measurement if they are to increase capital efficiency and profitability.

Chile is one of the more stable markets in the region, primarily because of tight controls over insurance products and asset portfolios. This stability is essential in a market that offers rich growth potential. While the ease of doing business in the country presents an opportunity, product expansion remains an emerging challenge due to a lack of insurance product awareness and consumer perceived value.

Colombia

Colombia enjoys strong economic growth and enormous potential for financial stability over the next three to five years. GDP growth is about 4% a year, ahead of the average for the region. This is driven by stronger activity from foreign investors, a stable macroeconomic environment and a growing middle class. The free trade agreements that Colombia has engineered with major world markets are one example of the tremendous potential the country offers.

Insurance regulation is moving toward a more risk- and economic value-based solvency framework, with tightened capital market regulations. As a result, Colombia is ahead of many global rapid growth markets in reforming regulatory processes, protecting investor rights and cross-border trading to increase the ease of doing business for small companies.

Recent rules that allow foreign insurance companies to establish branches and operate as local insurers have changed the complexion of the Colombian market. Global industry players are entering, buying local insurers or considering start-up companies. This should encourage increased capacity, product diversification and greater competition. Colombia’s premium growth was US$8b in 2013, and rate reductions of as much as 10% were expected for property and life/accident insurance in 2014.

Mexico

The Mexican insurance market is the second largest in Latin America. As of December 2013, gross premiums totaled $334.19 billion Mexican pesos or approximately US$25.6 billion, an increase of 11% over the prior year; this increase includes the effect of a large biannual policy of the government. Despite having one of the lowest proportions of insurance penetration in the region (almost 2% of GDP), Mexico continues to grow above the country’s nominal GDP. New insurance laws and Solvency II regulations are leading to market consolidation, as well as growth in specialty and consumer product lines. The high demand for life insurance is reflected in individual life premiums, which rose 23% in 2013, following a 19% increase in 2012, basically for the success of some savings products.

The regulatory framework in Mexico is evolving toward a more sophisticated risk-based capital approach. A proposed Solvency ll – type insurance law has been under review by the Mexican regulator, Comision Nacional de Seguros y Fianzas (CNSF) and the Mexican association of insurance companies, Asociacion Mexicana de Instituciones de Seguros (AMIS) since the second half of 2008.
The Mexican Congress approved the new regulation in April 2013. Quantitative impact studies and qualitative impact studies are moving forward, and new accounting principles are under discussion. Legislation in the country continues to advance and is likely to be implemented ahead of the rest of the region.

Peru

Peru’s steady economic growth and expanding middle class are attracting new business and opening doors for insurance companies. The Peruvian economy is supported by rapid growth in investment, low inflation, strong economic fundamentals and an annual GDP growth rate of nearly 6%. The country has an investment rating in Latin America that is second only to Chile and offers a favorable legal framework for foreign investors. The financial sector, including insurance, is second only to mining (gold, zinc and copper) in direct foreign investment.

In the last decade, insurance industry sales in Peru have grown more than 200%, from PEN2,700 million (approximately US$776 million) to PEN9.069 million (approximately US$3.36 billion) in 2013. As of December 2013, 40% of total net premiums were from general insurance, 14% from accident and health, 21% from life insurance and 25% from the private pension fund system. It is important to note that only approximately 16% of the urban population has private insurance and 18% has health insurance – and this number has stagnated over the past five years.

The insurance market is highly concentrated in Peru, with 2 of the 15 insurance companies accounting for 60% of total gross written premiums. Overall, insurance penetration rates remain low, as they are in many other Latin American countries.

Uruguay 

Uruguay is a small country with stable economic growth, expanding tourism and rising disposable income. It was one of the few countries in Latin America that was able to avoid recession in 2008, and it continues to grow, with an economy based largely on exports of commodities like milk, beef, rice and wool. Some of world’s largest banks and financial institutions maintain branches there, and it was fortunate not to experience the impact of the global financial crisis or ensuing government intervention.

Although the Uruguayan insurance market is highly competitive, it has no more than 15 companies competing for market share. The largest in the country is Banco de Seguros del Estado (BSE), a government-owned insurer with about 65% of the market share as of December 2013.

Gross written premiums for the insurance industry totaled UYU21.6 billion (US$1.1 billion) in 2012, with a CAGR growth rate of almost 19%. Motor insurance and general liability insurance were leaders in the non-life segment. An increase in demand for pension products contributed to the significant growth in the life segment.

For the full report from which this excerpt is taken, click here.