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Industry Trends for 2017

Every day, our colleagues take care of people facing uncertain situations. Whether they have a workplace injury, need time away for the birth of a child, experience a medical situation that will lead to time off, are in an auto accident or suffer product or property damage, we are here to let them know that it’s going to be okay.

Part of our job in caring for these people is to simplify and clarify the process and to explain what consumers can expect. An evolving system, shifting regulations, rapidly advancing technology and economic uncertainties add to the complexities they face. Key areas in the spotlight for the coming year include good health empowerments, regulation transformations, consumer-centric progressions, risk circumventions and tech modernisms.

We will continue to offer our insights as we monitor the following business advancements and challenges throughout 2017:

Good health empowerments

Accessing care via technology

Technology advancements will continue to influence healthcare delivery. Connecting a specific injury or condition with a quality provider in a virtual setting for more immediate treatment will make these advancements more readily acceptable and increase demand.

Balancing the scale of pain management

Increasing opioid addiction and the legalization of medical marijuana will ensure pain management remains at the forefront of industry discussions. Increased education about the dangers of opioid abuse, the availability of marijuana as a medical alternative and the introduction of alternative pain management techniques will continue to dominate the conversation.

Supporting mental health initiatives

The pressures to reduce stigma and strengthen initiatives aimed at psychosocial issues and behavioral health will continue to mount. The linkage between absence at the workplace and mental health will continue to be highlighted.

See also: 10 Insurance Questions for 2017  

Regulation transformations

Compliance enforcement

Employers will continue to manage compliance-related issues as they respond to changes in the ADA/ADAAA, FMLA and other federal and state laws affecting our industry. Political reorganization and shifting administrative priorities may also create regulatory shifts for OSHA and the EEOC.

Navigating regulatory changes

Assessing the impact of provisions introduced by newly elected officials from the federal and state level in the areas of healthcare, workers’ compensation and parental leave will be at the forefront. It will be necessary to monitor newly introduced legislation in key states such as California, New York and Florida to determine how best to respond and comply with new regulations.

Workers’ compensation strategies

Primary steps among industry leaders include finding common ground and developing strategies focused on benefiting all key stakeholders. Those who favor a federal workers’ compensation option point to inconsistent benefits, rules and regulations among the states. Others believe the state systems have proven to be effective and simply need to be updated. By understanding what should be changed or replicated, legislators can work to revitalize workers’ compensation and help ensure that it continues to fulfill its original purpose.

Consumer-centric progressions

Enhancing the claims experience

The current claims paradigm will continue to shift and be characterized by an increasing focus on the consumer. The needs of injured or ill employees and other consumers will assume center stage. Claims expectations will be established early on; information and resources to support the consumers’ needs will become more readily available; and care and concern will drive and transform the claims experience.

Bridging benefit models

Integrated benefit plans have long been discussed, but not widely implemented. Pushing the boundary between various benefit providers, administrators, payers and employers through advanced online platforms could be at the forefront of many discussions. In addition to technology advancements, there is a renewed health, wellness and compliance mindset that is fostering increased interest in integration.

On-demand consumerism

Consumer and customer expectations are on the rise, and providing an immediate response has become expected in many industries. Increased connectivity and immediate communication are now the standard. In the past, it was enough to provide claim and case details through push technology, seamless payment processing and direct bank deposits. Now, the gold standard is to provide a consumer-focused experience where access to resources and data are a click away. With enhanced consumer engagement comes faster resolution, reduced litigation and reallocation of resources to focus on more complex matters.

Risk circumventions

Crisis plans

Building resiliency through new predictive models in pre-catastrophic events and using new technologies in post-disaster recoveries is on the mind of many employers. Whether the emergency is natural or man-made, cyber- or product-related or a supply chain interruption, having the right pre-catastrophe plan in place continues to be a discussion among employers, brokers, carriers and payers.

Geo risks

More organizations are likely to consider an enterprise-wide response to growing political, economic and global risks as customer markets expand. There is also an increasing need to address travel risks for employees servicing global customers on a short-term or interim basis, and ensure preparedness plans are in place.

Talent strategies

There continues to be a need to attract, train and retain new talent as baby boomers enter retirement years. Employers must learn how to accommodate multiple generations with varied preferences – from telecommuting to technology – and ensure successful integration with the existing workforce. Creating strategies and using new tools for knowledge sharing will help enhance communication and understanding.

See also: 2017 Priorities for Innovation, Automation  

Tech modernisms

Artificial and emotional intelligence

The rapid advancement of technology has led to conversations and interest in artificial and emotional intelligence. Developments in these areas and others such as new connected health technologies, Internet of Things, drones, driverless cars and services using virtual technology are contributing to privacy law and ethical guideline debates.

Explosion in actionable data

With today’s technology advancements and increasing number of connected devices come an explosion in actionable data, creating a need for more data miners. There is a growing demand for data scientists and engineers who can interpret actionable information. The use and expectation of having more refined predictive analytics to drive decisions will continue to increase and underscore the need for this specialized talent. Deciphering actionable insights as more data pours in from various connected devices will continue to be an important topic of discussion.

Self-service innovations

Having been introduced in the banking and airlines industries early on, consumer self-service options are becoming increasingly popular in the risk and benefits industry. Consumers of claims services are seeking the same user experiences that they have become accustomed to in the B2C world, including instant information access, connectivity to tech support and two-way communication when and how they want it.

You can find the original report here.

What An Employer Can Do To Reduce Soft Tissue Injuries In The Transportation Industry

The trucking industry accounted for nearly 20 percent of all days-away-from-work cases in 2011. Correspondingly, trucking was among the seven occupations which had an incidence rate greater than 300 cases per 10,000 full-time workers and who had greater than 20,000 days-away-from-work cases.

OSHA defines a Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD) as an injury of the muscles, nerves, tendons, ligaments, joints, cartilage and spinal discs. They identify examples of Musculoskeletal Disorders to include: carpal tunnel syndrome, rotator cuff syndrome, De Quervain’s disease, trigger finger, tarsal tunnel syndrome, sciatica, epicondylitis, tendinitis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, carpet layers knee, herniated spinal disc, and low back pain.

The average cost of a work-related soft tissue injury in the trucking industry exceeds any other industry. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Musculoskeletal Disorders nationwide typically account for 33% of work-related injuries, while the incidence of Musculoskeletal Disorders in the transportation industry is 60-67%. The Bureau of Labor Statistics also noted that there were 1.4 million total transportation workers, and each year 1 in 18 is injured or made ill by the job.

These higher rates of injury can be attributed in part to several factors. Due to the nature of their work, many drivers maintain a poor diet, rarely get enough sleep, and are sedentary. As a result, they find themselves more susceptible to heart attacks and diabetes, as well as a myriad of strains, sprains and various other Musculoskeletal Disorders.

Additionally, the percentage of older workers is higher in transportation than in most industries, with the Transportation Research Board estimating that up to 25 percent of truck drivers will be older than 65 by 2025, translating into more severe Musculoskeletal Disorder claims.

These factors are contributing to more workers’ compensation claims for drivers which increase employers’ costs. As part of the job, many truck drivers are required to unload the goods they transport, leading to serious sprains and strains. Heavy lifting after long periods of sitting can increase the likelihood of severe sprains and strains. In addition, drivers often rush at the delivery site in an effort to meet the demands of tight schedules. This combination contributes to 52% of the non-fatal injuries in this industry, with trunk and back claims accounting for 70% of these cases.

Due to its unique workplace circumstances, the commercial transportation industry is at higher risk for increased frequency of injuries and costs to the industry. The following describes the framework of this dilemma:

  1. Commercial transportation jobs expose workers to high physical demands and extended hours of exposure.
  2. The transportation industry experiences one of the highest work-related injury rates among all workplace sectors.
  3. The transportation industry experiences a high level of turnover on an annual basis, which results in a high number of newly hired employees exposed to unfamiliar and physically demanding tasks.

While this is an industry-wide issue, we will focus on California in order to illustrate how problematic it truly is. In March of 2010, the California Workers’ Compensation Institute (CWCI) issued its latest scorecard for the California Trucking Industry. Over eight years, $480 million dollars was paid in medical and indemnity costs alone. The study found that, even though this industry accounted for only 1% of all California industrial claims, they accounted for 1.8% of the state’s workers’ compensation paid benefits. It was also found that medical and indemnity payments were higher than any other industry. The average lost-time direct claim cost at $18,587 is 41% higher than the industry average in California. The indirect costs in this industry range from a 2x to a 10x multiple, and in an industry known for low profit margins, controlling costs is critical.

It should also be noted that California can retain jurisdiction of a workers’ compensation claim even if the injury did not occur in that state; the employee only has to live in California, drive through California or have been hired out of California. This is such a significant problem that in 2010 the U.S. Department of Transportation initiated the Compliance Safety Accountability measure of driver’s fitness. This is specific to transportation, is publicly available, and the ratings are tied to insurance rates and letters of credit.

With the numerous reforms taking place in 2013 and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Mandatory Reporting Act, it is now essential that employers become proactive and only accept claims that arise out of the course and scope of employment. Medicare has mandated all work-related and general liability injuries be reported to CMS in an electronic format. This means that CMS has the mechanism to look back and identify work comp-related medical care payments made by Medicare. This is a retroactive statute that will ultimately hold the employer and/or insurance carrier responsible for these payments.

Should CMS have to pursue the employer in court, the amount owed is doubled. The insured or employer could pay the future medical cost twice — once to the claimant at settlement and later when Medicare seeks reimbursement of the medical care they paid on behalf of the claimant. There is no statute of limitations on compliance with the MSA requirements. CMS can review claims closed last year, five years ago, or even longer to check for compliance. Penalties and fees for noncompliance are $1,000 per day if medical care is not paid within 30 days.

Historically, soft tissue injuries have been difficult to diagnose and even harder to treat due to the broad spectrum of disorders related to soft tissue. Most diagnostic tests are not designed to address Musculoskeletal Disorders and are unable to document the presence of pain or loss of function … two key complaints.

Employers need a way to manage their Musculoskeletal Disorder exposure and provide better care to their injured workers. The key to managing this problem is for employers to obtain the ability to only accept claims that arise out of the course and scope of employment. The only viable solution for employers is to conduct a baseline soft tissue assessment in order to establish pre-injury status. The baseline must be job and body part specific and objective to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008.

The baseline assessments are not read or interpreted unless and until there is an injury. By not identifying a potential disability, employers are able to conduct baseline assessments on new hires as well as existing employees while maintaining compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act. If there is a soft tissue injury, the employee is sent for a post-loss assessment to determine what and if there is any change from the baseline assessment. If no change is noted (no acute pathology), then there is no valid claim. This proven baseline program is known as the EFA Soft Tissue Management Program (EFA-STM Program), which utilizes the Electrodiagnostic Functional Assessment to objectively provide this data.