Tag Archives: actuary

Section 831(b) Captive Insurance Companies And The Tax Preparer Penalty

An Actual Scenario: A CPA was preparing the tax return of a longtime client who had purchased three captive insurance companies from a well-known provider of such entities, and had paid $3.3 million in insurance premiums to these companies. The client wished to show that payment as a tax deductible item. The client had $28 million in revenue and paid $92,000 annually for their usual third-party insurance program. The insurance premiums paid to these new captives were for “coverages” that supplemented their existing insurance. What could the CPA do with this request?

Background: Owners of profitable businesses are attracted to the tax and financial planning benefits of forming and owning a captive insurance company that qualifies for the tax benefits of section 831(b) of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”).

The Code section provides that if an insurance company has no more than $1.2 million in annual premium income, it can elect to exempt that income from taxation. And under a series of judicial decisions and Revenue Rulings, the insured company may be able to fully deduct the premium paid, even if the same person (or persons) owns both the insured and the insurance company.

This concept can be financially powerful, resulting in an immediate reduction in the owner's tax bill, yet virtually all of the funds remain tax free inside a related company. The profits of that company can either be accessed later at capital gains rates or passed to heirs outside of the estate tax regime.

The Problem: The deductibility of the premium is not automatic. The hurdles for properly deducting premiums paid to one's own insurance company are both numerous and, to some extent, subjective. The new insurance company must demonstrate sufficient “risk distribution,” the amounts charged by the insurance company as premium for the coverages offered must be “reasonable,” and the client must demonstrate an adequate “business purpose” for entering into the transaction, to name just a few of the important hurdles involved. These are each very important requirements that a tax preparer is unlikely to be able to judge with any degree of comfort.

Tax preparers who face the request to sign a return that reflects the deduction of such premiums must be careful not to run afoul of the Return Preparer Penalties of section 6694 of the Code. In addition, the client could face an accuracy-related penalty under section 6662 of the Code equal to 20 percent of the underpaid tax should the deduction ultimately be disallowed.

The standard for avoiding the Return Preparer Penalty is that the preparer held a reasonable belief that the position (the deductibility of the insurance premium) would have a greater than 50 percent likelihood of being sustained on its merits.

One of the factors included in the Regulations covering Section 6662 to determine whether a tax return has been negligently prepared is “failure to reasonably ascertain the correctness of an item that to a reasonably prudent person would appear 'too good to be true' under the circumstances.”

In this case, it appeared that a sudden increase in insurance expense from $92,000 to over $3 million might make the deduction of that expense “too good to be true.” But how could the preparer “reasonably ascertain” the likelihood of this deduction being upheld in audit?

The third party that the client relied on for advice in this transaction was the captive insurance company provider that sold them the program in the first place. But that party obviously believed that their program was fully compliant and therefore could not deliver a truly objective response to the CPA's concerns.

The client's attorney was not versed in captive insurance companies and could not be helpful without an expensive journey up the learning curve.

Turning to another captive insurance provider for an analysis of the client's situation was an obvious option. But each provider has their own competing program and clearly has an incentive to undermine the competition and encourage the client to switch providers. Certainly this may not always be the case, but it is wise to question the objectivity of the person doing the analysis if that person is a competitor.

The Solution: In this case, the CPA needed two sources of help. First, she needed to find an expert in captive insurance who did not also offer his own competing program. Second, she had to find an independent actuary who was familiar with captive insurance programs and who would be willing to opine as to the “reasonableness” of the premiums being charged by the captives.

Finding these independent advisors required networking with other CPA firms, searching the web for relevant articles and identifying their authors, and locating captive insurance sites and blogs.

The Result: The independent advisor created a report that the CPA could rely on, stating that while the structure of the captive insurance program would likely be compliant, the amounts of the premiums being charged did not appear reasonable, given both the nature of the client's business and relevant premium rates in the third-party market. The CPA then advised the client to hire an independent actuary to perform a rate review. The actuary ultimately opined that the client could reasonably support premiums of about half of the amount originally considered.

The client got a large tax deduction and the preparer had in file objective third-party support for the position ultimately taken on the tax return. While this support does not guarantee a favorable result in the event of audit, it should be very valuable evidence in any such audit and should satisfy the requirements for avoiding the Return Preparer Penalty.

Waiver Of Premium: The Unmanaged Liability

This is Part 1 of a two-part series on waiver of premium. Part 2 can be found here.

Insurance actuaries consider waiver of premium (WOP) a neglected liability — a supplemental benefit rider that has yet to be fully evaluated for risk exposure or cost containment, unknowingly costing individual and group life insurance carriers billions in liability every year.

The problem is that many companies don't have accurate claim management systems capable of reporting what's really happening with the life waiver reserves that are sitting on their books. But with a 44 percent increase in disability claims by people formerly in the workplace1, it's time this largely ignored liability is held up to the light.

Why Companies Need To Pay Attention
Most life insurers aren't fully aware of how much of a liability they're carrying when it comes to their waiver of premium reserves. Moreover, they're even less likely to know critical information such as the number of open life waiver claims, the percentage of approvals and denials, or claims still holding reserves that perhaps maxed out years ago.

Tom Penn-David, Principal of the actuarial consulting firm Ant Re, LLC explains: “There are generally two components to life waiver reserves. The first is active life reserves (for individual insurers only) and the second is disabled life reserves, which is by far the larger of the two. A company that has as few as 1,000 open waiver claims with a face value of $100,000 per policy, may be reserving $25+ million on their balance sheet, depending on the age and terms of the benefits. This is a significant figure when coupled with the fact that many life insurers do not appear to be enforcing their contract provisions and have a higher than necessary claim load. Reserve reductions are both likely and substantial if the proper management systems are in place.”

Unfortunately, by not knowing what's broken the situation can't be fixed. Companies need to examine their numbers in order to recognize the level of reserve liability they're carrying, and to see for themselves the significant financial and operational consequences of not paying attention. Furthermore, a company's senior financial management team may be underestimating the actual number of their block of waiver claims, thus downplaying the potential for savings in this area. Typically, the block of existing claims is much larger than new claims added in any given year, and often represents the largest portion of overall liability.

“Life companies are primarily focused on life insurance reserves and not carefully looking at waiver of premium,” Oscar Scofield of Factor Re Services U.S. and former CEO of Scottish Re., says. “There could be a significant reserve redundancy or deficiency in disabled life reserves and companies need to pay attention to recognize the impact this has on their bottom line.”

To illustrate this point, let's take a quick look at the financial possibilities for a company with even a small block of life waiver claims:

Example – Individual Life Carrier Current Reserve Snapshot With Proactive Management
Number of Open WOP Claims 1,000 1,000
(*) Average Disability Life Reserves (DLR) $19,989,255 $19,989,255
(*) Average Mortality Reserves $3,046,722 $3,046,722
Average Premiums Paid by Carrier on Approved WOP Claims $754,427 $754,427
Average Total Reserve Liabilities $23,790,404 $23,790,404
Claim Approval Percentage 90% 60%
Reserves Based on Approval Percentage $21,411,364 $14,274,242
Potential Reserve Savings $7,137,121

* The above reserve data is based on Statutory Annual Statements.

As you can see, even under the most conservative scenarios, the reserve savings are substantial when a proactive waiver of premium claim management process is put into action.

Industry Challenges
The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) requires life companies to report financials that include both the number of policyholders who aren't disabled with life waiver, as well as reserves for those who are currently disabled and utilizing their life waiver benefits. But many items, like the number of new claims or the amount of benefit cost are not reported. Moreover, companies rarely move beyond these life waiver reporting touch-points to effectively monitor their life waiver claim management processes or to identify the impact of contract definitions on their claim costs.

The new and ongoing volume of claim information, manual processing, and the fact that life waiver claims involve months if not years of consistent, close monitoring, is humanly challenging — if not impossible. For example, it's not out of the ordinary to have only a few people assigned to process literally thousands of life waiver claims.

It's unfortunate, but this type of manual claim reporting continues to remain unchanged as claim personnel (working primarily off of three main documents: the attending physician's statement, the employee statement, and the claim form), quickly push claims through the system. The process is such that once these documents are reviewed (and unless there are any questionable red flags), the claim continues to be viewed as eligible, is paid, and then set-up for review another 12-months down the road. As long as the requests continue to come in and the attending physician still classifies the claimant as disabled and incapable of working, there isn't much done to proactively manage and advance the claim investigation.

An equally challenging part of the life waiver claim process is working off the attending physician statement — both when claims are initially processed, as well as when they are recertified. Typically very generic in nature, the statement often only indicates whether or not the claimant is or continues to be unable to work. This problematic approach essentially permits the physician to drive the course of the claim decision away from the management of the insurance company. The insurer, who is now having to rely on the physician's report to fully understand and evaluate the scope of the claimant's medical condition, has little information in which to manage the risk.

For example, did the evaluation accurately assess the claimant's ability to work infrequently or not at all? Are they able to sit, stand, walk, lift, or drive? If so, then what are the specific measurable limitations? Is there potential to transition them back into their previous occupation or into an occupation that requires sedentary or light duty — either now or in the near future? In order for companies to move beyond the face value of what has initially been reported, and to monitor where the claimant is in the process, they need to build better business models.

Closing The Technology Gap
The insurance industry as a whole has always been a slow responder when it comes to technology. But for companies to optimize profitability, closing the gaps in life waiver claim management and operational inefficiencies will require a combination of technology and human intervention. Investing in the right blend of people, processes, and technology with real-time capabilities, can substantially reduce block loads and improve overall risk results.

Constructing a well-defined business model to apply standardized best practices that can support and monitor life waiver claims is critical. The adjudication process must move beyond obvious “low hanging fruit” to consistently evaluate the life of the claim holistically. It means not only examining open claim blocks, but also those that are closed, to better identify learning and coaching opportunities to improve future claim outcomes.

Additionally, segmentation can provide great insight into specific areas within the block, by applying predictive modeling techniques. It can evaluate how claims were originally assessed, the estimated duration, and why a claim has been extended. For example, was there something regarding the claim that occurred to warrant the extension of benefits such as change in diagnosis?

Predictive modeling also looks at how certain diagnoses are trending within the life waiver block, so if anything stands out regarding potential occupational training opportunities, benefit specialists can effectively introduce the appropriate vocational resources at the right time for the insured.

Capabilities to improve outcomes in waiver of premium operations through technology and automation should include these three primary assessments:

  • Financial: Companies need to start looking at waiver of premium differently. They need to continually evaluate the declining profit margins on in-force reserves in order to identify the impact on profits. Even if a waiver of premium reserve block is somewhere between 10 and 200 million dollars, potential savings are likely to be 10 to 20%. Better risk management tools can substantially control internal costs and improve reserve balances.
  • Operational: Current business models have to move beyond the manual process to steer the claim down the right path from start until liability determination. Standardized automation brings together fragmented, disparate information systematically across multiple platforms, essentially unifying communications between the attending physician and the insurance company. This well-managed infrastructure gathers, updates, and integrates relevant data throughout the life of the claim.
  • Availability: A critical way to improve the life waiver claim process is through accurate reporting. By breaking down the silos between the attending physician, case manager, and the insurance company, claim related information can immediately be uploaded and reported in real-time. Proactively enhancing the risk management process to enable companies to consistently receive updated claimant health evaluation and physical limitation reports, is critical for best determining return-to-work employment opportunities.

Three Technology Touch-Points in Waiver of Premium Operations

Front end: Assessment of the initial claim and determining the best possible duration time.

Mid-point: An open claim should be reassessed to determine continued eligibility and to evaluate the direction of the claim if lasting longer than projected-and why.

End-point: The evaluation process continues to ensure claims are being re-evaluated at regular intervals, examining the possibility of getting the claimant back to work.

Why Waiver Of Premium Matters
What's typically happening is that most company's life claim blocks are managed on the same platform and in the same manner as their life claims, so ultimately the life waiver block is improperly managed. Life companies need to recognize that a waiver of premium block is not a life block but a disability block, and needs to be managed differently. For example, older actuarial tables do not reflect the fact that people with disabilities are living longer, potentially leaving companies with under-stated reserve liabilities.

Ultimately, having a good handle on the life waiver block will prove beneficial for both the carrier and the insured.

Part 2 of this series will discuss specifically how the introduction of process and technology into this manual and asynchronous area can deliver substantial benefits to life carriers.

1 Social Security Administration, April 2013.

So What Is the Actuarial Value Of My Health Benefit Plan?

Introduction
Now that health care reform is gradually rolling out into the market, the concept of the “actuarial value” of a specific set of benefits is increasingly important. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 defines four metallic categories of benefit plans ranging from Bronze to Platinum. The actuarial value of these categories range from 60% for Bronze increasing by 10% for Silver, Gold and capping out at Platinum at 90%. The benefit plans offered through the public exchanges will be required to offer benefit plans that are valued within ±2% of each of the metallic levels. This limitation is critical to benefit plan sponsors as they evaluate their current benefit plans.

Actuarial Value Defined
The actuarial value of a specific health plan is the ratio of net value of the actual benefits to the value of these same benefits without copays, deductibles, limits, and/or coinsurance or other items paid for by the individual covered under that plan. For example, in the case of a plan with an actuarial value of 70% (i.e., the Silver plan), this suggests that 30% of the cost is the responsibility of the individual and 70% is paid for by the health plan or carrier involved. Similarly a Gold plan (i.e., 80%) would cover 80% of the cost with the individual responsible for 20%.

As long as the plan has an actuarial value within 2% of the metallic target it would qualify for that metallic level. For example, a plan with an actuarial value in the range of 68% to 72% would qualify as a Silver Plan. A plan with a value outside of the 2% range would not quality as a specific metallic plan and could not be offered. As a result, it is critical to be sure you know the actuarial value of your plan and what metallic plan it qualifies for.

Actuarial Cost Model
The primary tool used to derive the actuarial value of a specific set of benefits is the actuarial cost model. This is a tool used by actuaries which presents detailed utilization, unit cost information, Per Member Per Month cost information, value of copays/ deductibles/ coinsurance, etc. The actuarial cost model typically includes assumptions for each of the major service types which could include as many as 50 or 60 categories of service. The standard definition used by our company includes the following categories:

Hospital Inpatient
  Medical Stays
Surgical Stays
Pediatric Stays
ICU/CCU
Neonatal ICU
Behavioral Health – Mental Health
Behavior Health – Substance Abuse Detox.
Behavioral Health – Rehabilitation
Maternity – Mother (Vaginal)
Maternity – Mother (C-Section)
Maternity – Well Newborn
Maternity – Other than delivery
Out-Of-Area
Skilled Nursing
Total – includes mat and snf
Hospital Outpatient
  Emergency Room
Outpatient Lab & Path Facility
Outpatient Surgery – Hospital Based
Outpatient Surgery – Free standing
Outpatient Surgery – Other
Home Health
Partial Day – Rapid Treatment Unit
Partial Day – < 24 Hour Observation Bed
Partial Day – Behavioral Health – Mental Health
Partial Day – Behavioral Health – Substance Abuse
Other Outpatient (PMPM)
Out-Of-Area (pmpm)
 
Radiology & Chemotherapy (Non-IP)
  CT/MRI/Nucl/Angio – Professional
CT/MRI/Nucl/Angio – Technical
Mammography
Radiation Therapy
Other Radiology – Professional
Other Radiology – Technical
Chemotherapy Services – Facility
Chemotherapy Services – Other
Out-Of-Area (pmpm)
Total
Physician Services – Primary Care
  Primary Care Surgery
IP Visits – Primary Care
Office Visits – Primary Care
Emergency Room Visits – Primary Care
Lab & Path – Primary Care Office
Consults – Primary Care
Immunization & Injection – Admin
Preventive Services
Cardiology – Primary Care
Pulmonology – Primary Care
Allergy – Primary Care
Behavior Health – Primary Care
Primary Care Management Fee
Total
Physician Services – Specialist
  Inpatient Surgery
Outpatient Facility Surgery
Office Surgery
Anesthesia Services
Inpatient Visits – Specialist
Inpatient Visits – Behavioral Health (Psych/Sub Abuse)
Inpatient Visits – Newborn
Office Visits – Specialist
ER Physician Visits
Radiology – Inpatient Professional
Lab & Path – Specialist Office
Lab & Path – Inpatient Professional
Lab & Path – Outpatient Professional
Consults – Specialist
Immunization & Injections – Serum
Physical Therapy
Speech Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Obstetrics – Delivery (Vaginal)
Obstetrics – Delivery (C-Section)
Obstetrics – Other
Well Woman Exams
Cardiology – Specialist Services
Pulmonology – Specialist Services
Allergy – Specialist Services
Neurology
Dialysis
Outpatient Behavioral Health – Specialist Services
Other Medicine
Out-Of-Area (pmpm)
Total
Prescription Drugs
  Generic
Formulary – Brand Name
Non-Formulary – Brand Name
Mail Order Drugs
Total
Other Services
  Ambulance
Appliances & Prosthetics
Chiropractic Services
Podiatry Services
Vision Services – Exam
Visions Services – lenses, frames, etc.
Total

Categories are often modified based upon the needs of the actual situation. However, for each of the specific categories of service, the critical assumptions are presented. These assumptions are for a specific population, managed in a specific way, with specific demographics, assumed charge levels, assumed health status, and assumed benefits.

An example of a specific set of utilization and cost assumptions is shown in the following table:

Illustrative Cost Model For Hospital Patient Services

Hospital Inpatient Annual Admits Per 1000 Length Of Stay Annual Bed-Days Per 1000 Average Cost Per Day N/A Average Cost Per Stay PMPM Claim Cost
  Medical Stays 21.20 3.90 82.68 $4,522.82 N/A $17,639.01 $31.16
Surgical Stays 14.50 4.45 64.53 $8,308.59 N/A $36,973.24 $44.68
Pediatric Stays 7.50 4.20 31.50 $5,628.40 N/A $23,639.29 $14.77
ICU/CCU 4.50 4.30 19.35 $9,045.65 N/A $38,896.28 $14.59
Neonatal ICU 2.20 5.50 12.10 $4,116.77 N/A $22,642.26 $4.15
Behavioral Health – Mental Health 2.50 6.50 16.25 $3,483.58 N/A $22,643.26 $4.72
Behavioral Health – Substance Abuse Detoxification 1.10 5.40 5.94 $1,809.13 N/A $9,769.30 $0.90
Behavioral Health – Rehabilitation 0.30 10.50 3.15 $1,340.10 N/A $14,071.00 $0.35
Maternity – Mother (Vaginal) 11.60 2.35 27.26 $5,156.02 N/A $12,116.64 $11.71
Maternity – Mother (C-Section) 3.90 3.95 15.41 $6,030.43 N/A $23,820.20 $7.74
Maternity – Well Newborn 15.50 2.20 34.10 $1,356.85 N/A $2,985.06 $3.86
Maternity – Other than delivery 0.91 2.10 1.91 $6,017.03 N/A $12,635.76 $0.96
Out-Of-Area 4.30 3.50 15.07 $7,236.52 N/A $25,327.81 $9.08
Skilled Nursing 1.80 11.45 20.61 $1,742.12 N/A $19,947.32 $2.99
Total – includes mat and snf 91.81 3.81 349.85 $5,202.06 N/A $19.821.75 $151.66

The utilization is shown on a “Per 1,000” basis and the claims cost is shown on a PMPM basis. PMPM stands for per member per month. The total shown above for Hospital Inpatient suggests that the overall inpatient hospital cost per covered life would be $151.66 per month prior to any offsets for deductibles, copays, coinsurance, provider discounts, medical management, demographic adjustments, etc. Similar assumptions are available for the rest of the categories previously shown. This information was developed for a typical commercially insured under age 65 population.

Developing Actuarial Values
Once the benefit design is determined, the information from the actuarial cost model is adjusted for variation in benefit design with the overall value of the benefits determined. The ratio of the value of the benefits to the overall value of covered services is the actuarial value of the benefit plan.

This is a fairly complex process. The government has developed their version of this process and has published a Federal AV Calculator. The final version of this was released on February 20, 2013. Most consulting firms have developed their own calculator to help their clients understand the process prior to the release of the Federal AV Calculator. Since the final calculator was released, there continues to be some serious concern by health actuaries as to the reasonableness of the federal calculator. We continue to use our own AV Calculator in addition to the Federal AV Calculator to better help our clients understand what variations in benefits lead to various AV values. This is a dynamic process with varying opinions depending upon the various plan designs and resulting AVs.

The following chart shows an illustrative result using our firm's AV calculator. This was prepared for a specific plan design in a specific geographic region. It is illustrative only to show the various components of cost variation.

View Chart

The above table shows each of the key variables affecting the actuarial value. Each is important to appropriately incorporate into the calculation. The starting Claim Cost in the first column is determined from the actuarial cost model previously discussed and will be adjusted for:

  • Geographic region
  • Health status
  • Smoking/non-smoking
  • Medical management
  • Utilization and cost inflation trend
  • Demographics

The first adjustment reflects the overall nature of the health benefit plan. A richer plan is associated with higher utilization, a lesser benefit plan is associated with lower utilization. The copay/deductible adjustment either raises or lowers the starting claims cost. The next step eliminates any costs that are excluded from the eligible expenses.

This particular example excluded brand drugs.

The next step evaluates the value of various copays (i.e., office visit copays, pharmacy copays, etc.). These are deleted from the value of the benefit costs since they are paid by the individual. Next coinsurance and deductible values are deducted. This example was developed for a $1,750 deductible 80% coinsurance plan. The last two adjustments are for the value of a family deductible limit and the out-of-pocket limit yielding the final cost. In this situation the final cost was $218.30. This was compared to the net value of benefits after excluded benefits (i.e., $309.85) with a ratio of 70.45% or a “silver” plan per our model.

Assuming this was consistent with the “authorized AV calculator” this plan could become a qualified plan under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Complications
As you can see there are many different steps in the process to determine the actuarial value of a benefit plan. There are even more assumptions that have to be made to obtain these estimates of value. Armed with this information the plan sponsor can make informed decisions as to what benefit plan is appropriate and what they want to offer, if any.

These calculations are frequently based upon considerable amounts of professional judgment. Not all actuaries think alike so there oftentimes can be professional differences of opinion. It is critical that the plan sponsor obtain professional input they can trust and rely upon.

The American Academy of Actuaries is the primary organization granting credentials that are relied upon in the industry. One approach to obtaining relevant and reliable input is to insist that your advisor is a qualified health actuary with credentials from the Academy. In most situations, this individual would have both an FSA and MAAA credential and be a recognized member of the Society of Actuaries Health Section. Others are qualified to provide this type of input but valid actuarial credentials provide increased assurance that good input is being offered.

California Workers' Compensation Self-Insurance Update

Under the new requirements of SB 863, California private (non-public entity) workers’ comp self-insured employers and self-insured groups (SIGs) starting this year are required to submit an actuarial study and an actuarial summary form to the Department of Industrial Relation’s Office of Self-Insured Plans (OSIP). Private self-insured employers’ actuarial submissions are due on May 1 and SIGs are due on April 15. The new actuarial study and summary form must both be prepared by a qualified actuary, as defined by OSIP.

Under SB 863, the method for calculating OSIP’s required security deposits has changed from the old method involving the Estimated Future Liabilities (EFL) formula (multiplied by a factor of 1.35 – 2.00) to the new actuarial methodology. This is considered the “gold standard” by insurers, captives, and other state Guaranty Funds as well. Self insurers are still required to submit their self-insured employers’ annual reports to OSIP as they have always done. This annual report covers the self-insured entity’s open workers’ comp claims by calendar year.

Those 340+ self-insured entities in the Alternative Security Program (ASP) of the Self-Insurers’ Security Fund (SISF) are part of the annual composite deposit program wherein SISF provides OSIP with their security deposit guarantee. They post nothing. Therefore, their security deposits are “notional” since SISF covers them. SISF’s ASP member assessments in July, 2013 will be adjusted (i.e. rebalanced) to reflect the new actuarial standard. Some ASP entities may experience increases or decreases in their annual assessments as a result of their restated open claim liabilities using a uniform actuarial standard. Currently, SISF member security deposits are based on factors of 135% to over 200% of their total EFL.

SISF's excluded entities are those that are required to post collateral (cash, LOC, securities, or security bonds) with OSIP. The 25 active California SIG's already post security deposits based upon an actuarial figure, but in 2013 SIG security deposits — like individual self-insureds — is at the undiscounted “expected level” versus the previous standard of an 80% confidence level.

Each self-insured's actuarial report must include: Incurred But Not Reported (IBNR) liabilities, Allocated Loss Adjustment Expense (ALAE), and Unallocated Loss Adjusted Expense (ULAE), less any credit for applicable excess insurance. Each of these amounts will be reported on the actuarial summary form. There are currently 55 single-entity self-insureds that will now be required to post their OSIP security deposit based upon their 2012 actuarial report submittal.

The new OSIP self-insured actuarial summary form was just placed on the OSIP website on February 14, 2013. (Note: These new requirements do not apply to government entities and JPA's).

The actuarial valuation report of the self-insured's open workers' comp claims must be as of December 31 of the previous year (i.e. 12/31/2012). Actuaries may roll forward liabilities to the December 31 date instead of having a separate study performed if the self-insured already has actuarial studies that use a different valuation date.

It's important to note that with nearly 500 self-insured entities being impacted in 2013 by SB 863 changes, exceptions to the requirement to file an actuarial summary are being developed and will be contained in a regular rulemaking package that should be publically announced within the next four to six weeks. The proposed exceptions will most likely only pertain to self-insurers that have a few open claims or a very low total ELF.

David Axene, a healthcare actuary and an Insurance Thought Leadership author and advisory board member, recommends Jeffrey R. Jordan and Frederick W. Kilbourne as actuaries who would be able to help you with the actuarial study and actuarial summary form now required as a result of the passage of SB 863:

Jeffrey R. Jordan, FCAS, MAAA
Phone: 818.879.1299
Send Jeffrey an Email

Frederick W. Kilbourne, FCAS, MAAA, FSA
Phone: 858.793.1300
Website: www.thekilbournecompany.com
Send Frederick an Email

Additional Resources To Help You Find An Actuary
Society of Actuaries
Online Directory of Actuarial Memberships

The Insurance Rate Public Justification & Accountability Act – Does It Get To The Real Problem?

A recent press release states, “The California Secretary of State announced today that a ballot initiative to require health insurance companies to publicly justify and get approval for rate increases before they take effect has qualified for the 2014 ballot.” The release goes on to state, “the initiative would require health insurance companies to refund consumers for excessive rates charged as of November 7, 2012 even though voters will not vote on the initiative until a later ballot.”

The President of Consumer Watchdog stated, “Californians can no longer afford the outrageous double-digit rate hikes health insurance companies have imposed year after year, and often multiple times a year. This initiative gives voters the chance to take control of health insurance prices at the ballot by forcing health insurance companies to publicly open their books and justify rates, under penalty of perjury. Health insurance companies are on notice that any rate that is excessive as of November 7th 2012 will be subject to refunds when voters pass this ballot measure.” This effort was supported by State Senator Dianne Feinstein and California Insurance Commissioner David Jones.

Is there more to the story? Is there something else we should be considering? Is it really this obvious that this is solving a major concern or problem?

As with most sensational statements, there is far more to consider as it relates to the affordability of health insurance. As a professional actuary for more than 41 years, I am afraid there is far more to this story than has been described by the proponents of this initiative. The remainder of this article will address some of the most obvious issues.

Do Carriers Intentionally Price Gouge Their Customers?
Although there always seems to be exceptions to the norm, carriers set rates based upon their historical costs and a reasonable projection of what might happen in the future. These rates are developed by professional actuaries who are subject to Guidelines for Professional Conduct that govern their analysis and review methodologies.

Rates are not made subjectively, but rather based upon extensive analysis of what costs have been. Actuaries spend endless hours reviewing the claims experience, analyzing utilization and cost levels, developing estimates of inflationary trends, analyzing operating costs and carefully projecting what future rates will need to be in order to cover costs and produce needed margins. When prior rates are inadequate, premium rates are increased on particular plans to avoid losses.

This process is very systematic and based upon detailed actuarial analyses. This process is not arbitrary or capricious, but can be challenging for some product lines. I know of no competent carrier that intentionally tries to gouge its customers, but rather the opposite. Carriers work hard to find ways to provide the greatest value to their customers and keep rates as low as possible.

Why Do Premium Rates Go Up So Much?
There are many reasons why rates increase but the most prevalent reason is the high cost of health care. Most of the premium goes to pay health care bills. Under health care reform at least 80% – 85% of the premium goes to pay for health claims. The carrier has little control over these costs other than their efforts related to negotiating discounts and in the impact of their care management activities. The carrier is subject to the prices charged by health care providers. Hospitals charge what they want to charge and carriers try to keep these down by negotiating and maintaining discounts from billed charges.

Since the government sponsored programs pay deeply discounted prices for Medicaid and Medicare members, sometimes below actual cost of care, the carriers are subject to a significant cost shift, paying prices much higher than their governmental counterparts. When providers increase their prices, carrier costs automatically increase. Other than the limited impact of regulation on prices for Medicaid and Medicaid patients, there is no oversight of what providers charge for their services. The fear by providers of the pending impact of health care reform and how it will expand the Medicaid population has resulted in some dramatic increases in provider charge levels to carriers.

In addition to the increases in provider costs, premium rates increase for other factors which include:

  • Aging: as members age, their costs increase as much as 1.5% – 2.0% per year
  • Selection bias at time of lapse: there is a strong tendency for a bias in lapsed or terminated members. The healthier members tend to lapse more quickly than others since they are more easily able to find alternate coverage. This tends to increase average costs about 1% – 1.5% per year, especially on individual and small group coverage.
  • Impact of underwriting: As individuals are reviewed by carriers for medical conditions at time of enrollment, more healthy individuals are enrolled. As time passes, the impact of this underwriting selection wears off and as a result the average costs increase by as much as 2% – 3% per year.
  • Deductible leveraging: As costs have increased over the years, individuals have preferred higher deductible programs to keep their costs down. Effective trend rates are higher on higher deductible programs based upon a concept known as deductible leveraging, even though the underlying trend is identical to that for a lower deductible program. For example the effective trend for a $3,000 could be a third larger than for a lower deductible. For example, for an underlying trend of 10%, the leveraged trend for a $3,000 deductible is 13.2% or 3.2% greater than what is expected.
  • Utilization trend: In addition to changes in what providers charge, the actual rate by which patients consume services is higher each year, by as much as 1% – 1.5% per year. Some services increase more rapidly.
  • Unit costs vs. CPI: National CPI statistics for health care are based upon a common market basket of services and do not reflect a reasonable norm from which to expect health care services to follow. Recent CPI statistics show a general economic trend of no more than 3%, with their medical statistics showing 5% – 6%. Carrier trends have been even higher for many reasons including the above factors.

The Unique California Situation
In most states the insurance commissioner has the authority to regulate rates carriers use for some of their products. Historically in California, the commissioner’s authority was somewhat limited. They required filing of some rates, but did not have the authority to stop a carrier from using a proposed rate or rate increase. They were able to exert some pressure, many times strong pressure, to stop a carrier from large rate increases, but if a carrier wanted to proceed they usually had the right to do so.

In recent years, the department resorted to some public pressure, some negative PR, and essentially threats to the carriers. The proposed initiative gives them the “authority” to do something meaningful, not just veiled threats. So as far as that is concerned, it is good to give more real enablement to do something meaningful to hold all carriers accountable for their actions. I do not believe there is any real concern about carrier behavior, at least among the major players.

The Real Issue
It’s always better to deal with the real cause of the problem, not just undesirable symptoms. If headaches are caused by a brain tumor, it is better to fix or remove the tumor, not just take a stronger pain killer. If the Insurance Rate Public Justification and Accountability Act is to fix the healthcare cost problem, then it is taking action on a symptom of the problem, not the real cause.

As discussed above, there are multiple reasons why health insurance premiums increase. Regulating the carriers alone doesn’t solve any of the underlying problems. It restricts the behavior of one of the middlemen. It doesn’t get to the core problem. It definitely will have an impact, but if not kept in check, will create perhaps even greater problems, potentially driving some carriers out of the market and perhaps transferring more of the problem to additional government bureaucracy.

Although the author is not a big fan of increased government regulation, some regulation or legislation focused on the prices providers are able to charge for services might be more beneficial. At least the major driving force of premium rate increases would be more stable and controlled which would keep premiums more in line.

Proposed Solution
Although fraught with additional challenges, my favorite solution to the provider charge driver is a shift from today’s system which has different prices for different payers to a system where all payers pay the same price (i.e., called the all-payer system). No matter what type of coverage a person has, the carrier/administrator would be charged the same price. This means that there would be no bias against government payers vs. private sector payers. This would increase the cost for the government for Medicaid, but would substantially reduce what the private sector pays.

Our firm’s analysis shows that setting the prices at Medicare payment levels for all patients would actually be a close proxy for a reasonable price. Private sector prices would drop in most markets by 15% – 17%. Medicaid prices would be increased to a reasonable Medicare payment level. Providers would have no reason not to take any patient since each patient brings the same revenue.

This would also level the playing ground for managed care plans and carriers since network differences would be eliminated. The plans could compete on more important items such as care management effectiveness, clinical efficacy, comparative effectiveness, and quality of the provider network.

Under this approach, Medicare would be the agency essentially regulating the reasonableness of prices. Significant administrative costs would be eliminated from both the carriers and the providers.

There would be a cost to the various states for raising the price they have to pay for Medicaid beneficiaries since they often have to pay 50% of the cost of these patients. Some of this could be offset by some increased federal payments from the savings generated in the system.

Bottom Line
California’s proposed initiative is interesting but probably not as big of a deal as it could be. Here’s hoping for some “real” legislation that could save more of us more “real” dollars and eliminate some of the administrative costs of the current system.