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September 10, 2013

Financial Reporting Of Medical Malpractice Self-Insured Losses

Summary:

Although actuarial analysis and financial reporting can be complicated, it is critical for management to have a full understanding and the ability to effectively communicate its program and story.

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Healthcare entities, or groups of physicians (through a captive), may self-insure losses to better control the costs of medical malpractice insurance, particularly when insurance premiums rise. Self-insured losses are typically estimated by an actuary, who will provide an unbiased estimate of the loss reserves and can also forecast losses for the next policy period for purposes of budgeting and assessing the feasibility of self-insuring, while an auditor will ensure full compliance with accounting and financial reporting standards. The following will provide background information and points to be discussed with the actuary and auditor.

Common Coverages

In a self-insured program, losses are retained by the program up to the self-insured retention amount, while losses greater than the retention amount are the responsibility of the excess or reinsurance policy. A claims-made policy provides coverage for claims that are reported within the policy period; claims reported after the policy expiration date are not covered. Most programs continually purchase claims-made policies for reportings in subsequent years. Occasionally, when a program changes excess carriers, it may purchase a tail policy for prior acts that have yet to be asserted. Physicians that purchase commercial claims-made coverage may also purchase a tail policy when leaving an organization or ceasing to practice.

When following guidance in the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification (ASC), most of these same entities record the self-insured liability in their financial statements on an occurrence basis. An occurrence basis is determined by when the incident happens, or occurs, regardless of when it is reported. An occurrence year can also be viewed as the combination of claims-made losses and tail reportings for claims occurring during a year that are unreported. It is important to note that if the physicians are covered on an occurrence basis by an entity (hospital or captive), but the entity purchases claims-made coverage from a commercial carrier for its physicians, then the entity is liable for the tail reportings.

Unpaid Claim Liability And IBNR

The self-insured liability recorded in financial statements has two main components: 1) case reserves on known claims and 2) an incurred but not reported (IBNR) provision for unknown losses. The case reserves are determined based on the most current available information about the known claims while IBNR losses are usually estimated by an actuary. The IBNR losses account for case reserve development on known cases, pure late reportings, reopened cases, and pipeline claims (reported but not yet recorded in the system as a claim). Liability is simply losses that have occurred but are unpaid.

Actuarial Theory

Actuaries utilize models, centered on the theory of consistency and the assumption that the past is predictive of the future, in order to project losses of a program. This includes similarities in reserving strategy, payment philosophy, homogeneous risk management exposures (same types of procedures, same mix of specialties and maturities of physicians), and other program design characteristics. Any intentional change in a program by management should be reported to the actuary to avoid redundant or inadequate estimations.

Financial Reporting Discussion Points

Five key financial reporting items to discuss with both the actuary and the auditor are listed below.

  • Discounting
    Currently, guidance in the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) Audit and Accounting Guide Health Care Entities permits, but does not require, medical malpractice reserves to be recorded in the financial statements on a discounted basis. In order to discount a malpractice liability: 1) the amount of the liability must be fixed or reliably determinable; 2) the amount and timing of cash payments for the liability, based on the healthcare entity’s specific experience, must be fixed or reliably determinable; and 3) the expected insurance recoveries, if any, must also be discounted. If discounted reserves are presented, management must disclose the discount and be able to support the discount rate, which may include 1) the return on investments used to pay claims expected to be realized over the period the claims are expected to mature; 2) a risk-free rate; and 3) highly rated corporate bonds with maturities matching the average length of a malpractice payment, all of which may need to be periodically adjusted for future expectations.
  • Percentile
    Some healthcare entities record malpractice liabilities and fund for these losses with a contingency margin, such as at the 75th percentile, selected by management based on the nature and loss experience of the entity. ASC 954-450-25 provides that the liability recorded is independent of funding considerations. ASC 954-450-30 states that an entity should use all relevant information, including entity-specific data and industry experience, in estimating the liability.
  • Gross vs. net presentation
    FASB Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2010-24, Healthcare Entities (Topic 954): Presentation of Insurance Claims and Related Insurance Recoveries, requires healthcare entities to report medical malpractice and similar liabilities on a gross basis, separately reporting any receivable relating to anticipated insurance recoveries. One of the outcomes of such gross presentation is to more clearly reflect the entity’s exposure to credit risk from the insurer, as the healthcare entity generally remains primarily liable for payment of claims until the insurer makes payments. ASU 2010-24 must be applied to all policies, including ground-up commercial policies, where the entity has a gross liability even though the net liability is $0.
  • Tail liability
    As addressed in ASC 720-20-25 and ASC 450-20-25, entities that maintain claims-made coverage must accrue for incurred but not reported claims and incidents as of the reporting date if the related loss is probable and reasonably estimable. Some believe the tail should be estimated based on an unlimited basis while others assume a limit based on the entities’ historical loss experience (also known as the “working layer”). Regardless of the limit assumed, the entity cannot assume that claims-made coverage will continue to be purchased in the future.
  • Conservatism in estimates
    Management should understand the amount of conservatism in the actuary’s estimate. Understanding the impact of large losses, where estimates fall within a range, and how actual loss experience is used compared to relying on industry information is important.

Working With The Actuary And Auditor

Management should set a goal to have frequent conversations and in-person meetings with both the actuary and the auditor. Although actuarial analysis and financial reporting can be complicated, it is critical for management to have a full understanding and the ability to effectively communicate its program and story. Finally, management should not be afraid to ask questions of both the actuary and auditor as this often leads to a better understanding for all parties and supports a collaborative working relationship between management, the actuary, and the auditor.

Authors

Richard Frese collaborated with Pat Kitchen in writing this article. Pat Kitchen is an assurance partner in the Chicago office of McGladrey LLP’s Great Lakes health care and not-for-profit practice. Pat leads McGladrey’s health care practice in Chicago and in its Great Lakes region. He has more than 24 years of experience serving a variety of health care organizations, including hospitals and health systems, specialty hospitals, academic medical centers and faculty practice plans, physician practices, and continuing care retirement communities. Pat assists clients with financial statement audits and reviews, compliance audits, accounting consultation, internal control reviews, acquisition-related due diligence, agreed-upon procedures and debt and equity financings.

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